George Lucas Educational Foundation

Critical Thinking

Whether via classroom discussions, analysis of written text, higher-order questioning, or other strategies, learn and share ways to help students go deeper with their thinking.

  • Easy Ways to Build Metacognitive Skills

    Learn strategies to increase student engagement and stop students from asking, "Why are we doing this?"
    Jordan Mattox
  • Building Perspective Through Meaningful Discussion

    When they don’t shy away from talking about tough topics, students and teachers gain a deeper understanding of important issues—and each other.
  • Connecting Public Speaking to Critical Thinking

    In a forum where students present their learning so that an audience of their peers can question and build on it, everyone learns.
  • Scaffolding Discussion Skills With a Socratic Circle

    Students deepen their understanding and build a sense of community by engaging with their peers’ reasoned arguments.
  • 60-Second Strategy: TAG Feedback

    This quick exercise scaffolds peer critique for elementary students.
  • Creating a Student-Run Museum in Your Classroom

    Letting students establish a museum exhibit with everyday items offers an opportunity to sharpen their storytelling skills.
  • Using Rubik’s Cubes to Teach Math

    A high school math teacher designed hands-on learning experiences and fostered deep engagement with Rubik’s Cubes.
  • Teaching Students How to Use Wikipedia Wisely

    Understanding how the online encyclopedia functions helps students learn how to conduct research and distinguish fact from fiction.
  • Questioning That Deepens Comprehension

    Scaffold students’ thinking about complex texts by asking what the text says, how it works, what it means, and what it inspires them to do.
  • Talking Politics: Valuing Different Perspectives

    Students learn how to share and listen to opposing beliefs with empathy.
  • Birmingham Covington: Building a Student-Centered School

    Educators take on the role of guides and motivate students to direct their own learning.
  • Generating Effective Questions

    Four ways to come up with questions that guide students to engage deeply with class content. Plus: a pop quiz for you.
  • Extending the Silence

    Giving students several seconds to think after asking a question—and up to two minutes for some questions—improves their learning.
  • Metacognition: Nurturing Self-Awareness in the Classroom

    When students practice metacognition, the act of thinking about their thinking helps them make greater sense of their life experiences and start achieving at higher levels.
  • Establishing a Culture of Questioning

    When students consistently ask meaningful questions, they get comfortable taking the risks that lead to learning.