George Lucas Educational Foundation

Project-Based Learning

Project-based learning is a dynamic classroom approach in which students actively explore real-world problems and challenges and acquire a deeper knowledge.

  • Providing Rich Educational Experiences for All Students

    With proper scaffolds, students with learning differences benefit greatly from challenging opportunities like project-based learning.
    Nina Parrish
  • Creating a Student-Run Museum in Your Classroom

    Letting students establish a museum exhibit with everyday items offers an opportunity to sharpen their storytelling skills.
  • Getting Started With Self-Paced Learning

    Giving students some control over the pace of their learning can help them develop self-reliance and better problem-solving skills.
  • Inquiry-Based Tasks in Social Studies

    Assignments that are bigger than a lesson and smaller than a unit are a good way to experiment with inquiry-based learning.
  • Project-Based Learning and the Research Paper

    Students take responsibility for their learning and develop solutions for complex problems when their research paper becomes a PBL unit.
  • Projects That Work: Mission to Mars

    Physics students assume the role of aerospace engineers to explore the real-world problem of how to land a rover on Mars.
  • Staying On Task During Project-Based Learning

    Brief daily meetings give students working in groups the structure to hold each other accountable on long-term projects.
  • A Research-Backed Science Curriculum

    Learning collaboratively through projects yields results for middle school students.
  • Getting Started With Project-Based Learning (Hint: Don’t Go Crazy)

    A handful of tips to help teachers ease into PBL without getting overwhelmed.
  • Twenty Ideas for Engaging Projects

    Twenty ideas for getting engaging projects going in your classroom.
    Suzie Boss
  • 6 Strategies for Differentiated Instruction in Project-Based Learning

    Reflecting on learning and student voice and choice are core elements of project-based learning, and they’re also key to differentiation.
  • What to Do When a Project Fails

    When project-based learning doesn’t work out as planned, students can still master content—and teachers can learn something too.
  • Guiding Students to Apply What They Learn

    A state Teacher of the Year used project-based learning to push her students to think critically and apply their learning in math.
  • Boosting Student Engagement Through Project-Based Learning

    A researcher-practitioner partnership in San Francisco shows promising results for middle school science students.
  • New Study Shows the Impact of PBL on Student Achievement

    Researchers in Michigan show that project-based learning in high-poverty communities can produce statistically significant gains in social studies and informational reading.