George Lucas Educational Foundation

Parent Partnership

For parents who are interested in engaging more deeply with their kids' teachers and school communities.

  • Parent Partnership

    When Students Lead Parent Conferences

    Revising the traditional parent-teacher conference allows middle school students to develop leadership and organizational skills.
  • Parent Partnership

    Building Relationships With Teachers

    A parent and former middle school teacher uses thank you notes at the start of the year to foster ties with her child’s teachers.
  • Parent Partnership

    Supporting Parents of Students With Special Needs

    There’s often a rift in communication between educators and parents who suspect their kids have special needs. A parent describes the support that would have helped her initiate an assessment.
  • Parent Partnership

    15 Questions to Replace ‘How Was School Today?’

    These questions will help you draw out important information from your kids.
  • Parent Partnership

    Parents: 19 Meaningful Questions You Should Ask Your Child's Teacher

    Back-to-school content is usually focused on teachers and students, and as these two groups will have the largest workload ahead of them, that makes sense. But for students, the ultimate support system is not an expert teacher, but an informed and supportive family.
  • Coding in the Classroom

    Teach Your Kids to Code: 6 Beginner's Resources for Parents

    Introducing computer programming to your kids can be a challenge, especially for those who aren’t familiar with the nuances of code. Fortunately, in the last few years, a number of apps, software, and guides have been produced that make the often-complex subject of computer coding easy to grasp for young learners. So where to begin? These are a few resources that parents can share with their kids to help them start learning about programming.
  • Parent Partnership

    An Appeal to My Child’s Kindergarten Teacher

    Educators face challenges, funding issues, and problems beyond their control. But for each student and family, it’s all about the relationship they will have with their child's teacher.
  • Back to School

    Building Trust With Parents

    Suggestions for how to make back-to-school night a hit for you and your students’ parents.
  • Parent Partnership

    7 Questions to Ask Parents at the Beginning of the Year

    As a beginning teacher I knew that it was important to connect with parents and to build a positive relationship with them, but at times I wasn't sure how to do this. In retrospect, I wish I'd asked more questions about their child and then listened more to what they had to say. After twenty years of experience and after sending my own child off to school, here are some questions I'd ask parents with the intention of building a partnership to support their child's learning.
  • Family Engagement

    5 Resources for Parent-Teacher Conferences

    Browse a curated list of resources for improving parent-teacher conferences, including ideas for highlighting student progress, ways to encourage students to take the lead, and questions every parent should ask.
  • Parent Partnership

    Teaching Good Study Habits, Minute by Minute

    With clear goals, timed exercises, and games, parents can help design home-study habits by tailoring them to their students' visual, kinesthetic, musical, or social strengths.
  • Parent Partnership

    Tips for Parent-Teacher Conferencing

    Check out these useful suggestions for teachers when sitting down with parents.
  • After-School Learning

    Fun and Free Summer Learning Resources

    To help combat summer learning loss, Matt Davis has curated a few fun and free education resources for students and parents to use over summer break. 
  • Brain-Based Learning

    Homework, Sleep, and the Student Brain

    Guest blogger Glenn Whitman, Director of the Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning, suggests a scientific approach to manageable homework: students should do it without interruption, and schools shouldn't assign too much of it.