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Inquiry-Based Learning

Instead of just presenting the facts, use questions, problems, and scenarios to help students learn through their own agency and investigation.

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  • Are Questions the Answer?

    The process of fine-tuning questions and engaging in discovery improves students’ critical thinking skills.
    Mike Lawrence, Lainie Rowell
    1.1k
  • Using Origami to Teach Children About Endangered Animals

    As elementary students turn squares of paper into animals they’re studying, the age-old Japanese art form makes lessons more memorable.
    533
  • Culturally Responsive Inquiry Learning

    A look at one way middle and high school teachers can equip their students with the skills to become independent thinkers.
    548
  • Dispelling Myths About PBL and Direct Instruction

    Dispelling Myths About PBL and Direct Instruction

    Linda Darling-Hammond discusses how well-placed direct instruction can scaffold rigorous, student-centered project-based learning.
    1.1k
  • Elementary aged students in classroom working in small groups.

    Inquiry-Based Learning in English Classrooms

    A look at how teachers can create projects that encourage students to collaborate and deeply engage in their work—even during distance learning.
    427
  • Teacher working with group of high school students on project

    Engaging Students With Community-Based Projects

    Having high school students research their town, including the history and local issues, can help them see ways to contribute to their community.
    266
  • A young girl is smiling, standing at the front of the class and reading, and her teacher and peers are clapping for her.

    What the Heck Is Inquiry-Based Learning?

    Teachers use inquiry-based learning to combat the “dunno” -- a chronic problem in student engagement. Check out these four steps for creating inquiry-based curriculum.
    24.1k
  • Colorful found kitchen objects

    How to Engage Students in Historical Thinking Using Everyday Objects

    Asking students to examine their own possessions from the perspective of a historian in the future helps them sharpens their analytical skills.
    3.3k
  • High school students engage in civic debate

    Inquiry-Based Tasks in Social Studies

    Assignments that are bigger than a lesson and smaller than a unit are a good way to experiment with inquiry-based learning.
    7.5k
  • High school students work together on project in classroom

    Discover, Discuss, Demonstrate: Using Inquiry-Based Learning to Keep Students Engaged

    The 3 Ds learning model is designed to facilitate deeper learning and increase student motivation.
    2.2k
  • Putting Students in Charge of Their Learning Journey

    Putting Students in Charge of Their Learning Journey

    By leaving space in their lessons for authentic curiosity to take hold, teachers can enable deeper learning.
    4.8k
  • High school classroom with teacher and students

    4 Ways to Encourage Students to Ask Questions

    When exploring their own questions is an integral part of class, students get more invested in working to find answers.
    1.1k
  • A collage of a landscape where people are gathering knowledge from their surroundings

    Want Mastery? Let Students Find Their Own Way

    Prominent scholars say that to drive deeper learning, students need to become accustomed to confusion—and develop the persistence to find their own answers.
    4.2k
  • A young boy is lying in the grass with a pencil in his hand, looking down at a red notebook filled with yellow paper

    Resources and Downloads to Facilitate Inquiry-Based Learning

    Find information, strategies, protocols, and tools to promote curiosity and engage students in asking questions, thinking critically, and solving problems.
    9.8k
  • Mathis in active dialogue with students sitting in circle on the floor with hands raised

    Inquiry-Based Learning: The Power of Asking the Right Questions

    An inquiry-based curriculum requires both planning and flexibility, as well as a teacher knowing the students well enough to anticipate their interests and limits.
    9.9k

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George Lucas Educational Foundation