George Lucas Educational Foundation

Collaborative Learning

Working together to solve problems and complete projects deepens students' learning and builds collaborative skills. Learn how to design activities to help develop these skills.

  • Using Comics to Teach the 4 Cs

    When students read comics or create their own, they have an opportunity to develop their creativity, critical thinking, and communication and collaboration skills.
    David Seelow
  • 4 Strategies to Improve Group Work

    Many teachers believe that group work is valuable for students but still struggle to implement it. Here’s how to avoid common pitfalls.
  • A Strategy for Boosting Student Engagement in Math

    A four-step approach to group work can get students talking and boost their mathematical and metacognitive thinking.
  • 60-Second Strategy: Respond, Reflect, and Review

    This simple activity helps students practice giving and receiving peer feedback—and gets them out of their desks.
  • 22 Powerful Closure Activities

    Quick activities that can be used to check for understanding or emphasize key information at the end of a lesson.
    Todd Finley
  • 60-Second Strategy: Cooperative Learning Roles

    Giving students randomly assigned roles in their group work helps ensure that they all participate.
  • Learning on Their Feet

    Vertical learning—a framework for high quality group work—showcases student thinking for everyone to see.
  • Designing a Public School From Scratch

    On a mission to reimagine traditional schooling, a K–8 school in San Diego puts teachers and students at the center.
  • Golden Rules for Engaging Students in Learning Activities

    When we think of student engagement in learning activities, it is often convenient to understand engagement with an activity as being represented by good behavior (i.e. behavioral engagement), positive feelings (i.e. emotional engagement), and, above all, student thinking (i.e. cognitive engagement) (Fredricks, 2014). This is because students may be behaviorally and/or emotionally invested in a given activity without actually exerting the necessary mental effort to understand and master the knowledge, craft, or skill that the activity promotes.
  • Encouraging Academic Conversations With Talk Moves

    Sentence starters that students use to join a class discussion encourage both academic thinking and social connectedness.
  • Student-Centered Learning: It Starts With the Teacher

    Teachers encourage student-centered learning by allowing students to share in decisions, believing in their capacity to lead, and remembering how it feels to learn.
  • Flexible Seating Elevates Student Engagement

    Breaking up rows of desks fosters collaboration and empowers kids to think about how they work best.
  • 3 Ways to Maximize Peer-to-Peer Learning

    Simple strategies you can use to have kids teach each other—a research-proven path to better learning.
  • Group Work That Works

    Educators weigh in on solutions to the common pitfalls of group work.
  • Staying On Task During Project-Based Learning

    Brief daily meetings give students working in groups the structure to hold each other accountable on long-term projects.