George Lucas Educational Foundation

Lesson Plans

Want the nuts and bolts of how other teachers are presenting material? Find Edutopia-curated downloadable and linked resources here.

  • Literacy

    How Living Poets Can Inspire Students

    A classroom activity for sharing the work of living poets shows students that poetry isn’t a thing of the past. 
  • Lesson Plans

    Studying Female Poets to Understand History

    Women have often been omitted from histories, but the work of female poets can give students a needed perspective.
  • Lesson Plans

    Using Twitter in World Language Classes

    Three ways to use tweets to introduce students to real uses of language in a context they’re likely already familiar with.
  • Curriculum Planning

    5 Highly Effective Teaching Practices

    We teachers are always looking to innovate, so, yes, it's essential that we try new things to add to our pedagogical bag of tricks. But it's important to focus on purpose and intentionality -- and not on quantity. So what really matters more than "always trying something new" is the reason behind why we do what we do.
  • Teaching Strategies

    22 Powerful Closure Activities

    Too many university supervisors and administrators criticize the absence of lesson closure, the activity that ends a lesson and creates a lasting impression. Like contracting your bicep at the top of a dumbbell curl, closure squeezes an extra oomph into a lesson. Find 22 closure strategies in this article by Todd Finley.
  • Student Engagement

    5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students

    Many would agree that for inquiry to be alive and well in a classroom that, amongst other things, the teacher needs to be expert at asking strategic questions. With that in mind, if you are a new teacher or perhaps not so new but know that question-asking is an area where you'd like to grow, start tomorrow with these five ideas.
  • Social and Emotional Learning

    Kindness: A Lesson Plan

    Classroom activities and resources for developing a vital character trait.
  • Lesson Plans

    The Great Gingerbread House Project

    Keeping fourth graders engaged in math in the run-up to winter break is easier with this sweet project.
  • Digital Citizenship

    How to Teach Internet Safety to Younger Elementary Students

    A lesson plan for helping students as young as kindergarten begin to understand how to be safe online.
  • Lesson Plans

    April Fool's Day in the Classroom: 8 Resources for Teachers

    If you’re looking for ideas for classroom pranks, these are a few of our favorite April Fool's Day resources and teaching ideas.
  • Student Engagement

    Bell Ringer Exercises

    Because of pressure to teach bell-to-bell, many classrooms now start with bell work—short exercises that students complete while the instructor handles attendance and other administrative chores. I’ve collected several creative, practical, and entertaining exercises that can function as bell ringers or sponge activities.
  • School Climate

    Building Staff Rapport With Flash Lessons

    A hands-on administrator asks teachers to become students for a class period and, at his prompting, model trust, academic risk taking, and camaraderie.
  • Formative Assessment

    Creative Ways to Grade and Provide Feedback for Students

    Students need feedback often and creating a system by rubber stamping work can provide visible and immediate proof of student progress.
  • Student Engagement

    6 Engaging End-of-Year Projects

    I don't know about your students, but so many of mine, coupled with Senioritis, were done after state testing. With just a few precious weeks left in the school year, what do you do to keep the kids energized and on board with learning? One thing I knew for sure when it came to my high school students: They had to feel as if they weren't actually doing work. (Yep, I had to trick them.)
  • Creativity

    22 Simple Ideas for Harnessing Creativity in the Elementary Classroom

    Look through the door of one classroom and you might see the students hunched over, not engaged, even frowning. Look through the door of another classroom, and you might see a room full of lively students, eager, engaged and participating. What is the second teacher doing that the first one isn't? He or she is using creativity in that classroom.