George Lucas Educational Foundation

Laura Lee

Laura Lee is an editor and writer. She graduated from UNC-Chapel Hill in 2002 with a bachelor’s degree in political science and international studies. She worked as an educator with a civic education organization and then as a program administrator for two Fulbright grant programs.

She received her J.D. from UNC-Chapel Hill School of Law in 2007. Laura briefly strayed from her Tar Heel allegiance in 2011 to obtain a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Maryland where she was an Eleanor Merrill Fellow. She worked at NPR producing content for the Washington desk, All Things Considered and Talk of the Nation. As assistant news director and then managing editor at WUNC North Carolina Public Radio, she oversaw production of a live daily show, The State of Things. She was the content director and managing editor for EducationNC and the N.C. Center for Public Policy Research.

Posts

  • Literacy

    Why Reading Aloud to Middle School Students Works

    The benefits of reading aloud aren’t limited to elementary students. One middle school teacher explains how “read-alongs” improve comprehension and boost engagement.
  • Education Equity

    A Framework for Supporting Gender-Diverse Students

    An initially skeptical school principal leans into a challenge and creates a new culture of safety for gender-diverse kids.
  • Student Engagement

    5 Tips for Unleashing Student Creativity Through Writing

    Expand the possibilities of journaling by encouraging students to doodle, diagram, or make flipbooks.
  • Arts Integration

    Transforming a School Through Arts Integration

    Structuring a school around the arts can help students excel academically and develop social and emotional skills.
  • Social and Emotional Learning

    A Simple Practice Yields Big Results in Middle School for Less Than $2

    A new study shows how a low-cost writing exercise improves the sense of belonging for incoming middle school students.
  • Teacher Development

    Teaching Isn’t a Personality Contest

    One way to become an exceptional teacher is to focus less on traits like humor and charisma and more on self-awareness and interactions with students.
  • Student Engagement

    How to Increase Participation by Asking Better Questions

    Framing questions the right way—and scaffolding the right kinds of responses—can help teachers avoid blank stares and awkward silences.
  • School Leadership

    Tips From Principals for Better Teacher Evaluations

    School administrators can use these simple tactics to make evaluations more actionable and meaningful.
  • Teaching Strategies

    Optimizing Station Rotations in Blended Learning

    Using three stations effectively—teacher-led, online, and offline—should provide your students with plenty of ways to collaborate.
  • Education Equity

    An Engaging Word Game Helps Students Grasp Implicit Bias

    A simple fill-in-the-blank exercise helped students understand the power of words and the way they might convey unspoken beliefs.
  • Teaching Strategies

    Simple Ways to Integrate Four Evidence-Based Teaching Strategies

    Jennifer Gonzalez talks with a researcher and a teacher to tackle the science—and the logistics—behind teaching strategies like spaced practice and interleaving.
  • Technology Integration

    Students Need to Learn to Manage Their Own Screen Time

    When students understand the benefits of limiting screen time, they are better able to manage their own distractions.
  • Teaching Strategies

    Teaching Students How to Ask Productive Questions

    Improve engagement, comprehension, and critical thinking by teaching students the process of asking insightful questions.
  • STEM

    The Best (Free) Posters of STEM Women

    Our periodically updated list of beautiful, free posters—along with a few good reasons why you should display them in your classroom.
  • Curriculum Planning

    Evidence-Based Scheduling With Daniel Pink

    The best-selling author explains why the order of the school day should look different for elementary and high school students.