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Teacher Education Student at Northern Caribbean University, Jamaica

Very interesting discussion!

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Very interesting discussion!

The think-aloud method is one that "helps students to monitor their thinking as they read an assigned passage. Students are directed by a series of questions which they think about and answer aloud while reading. This process reveals how much they understand a text. As students become more adept they learn to generate their own questions to guide comprehension."

I personally believe that this is a good method to use as teachers because, it allows the teacher to model and also guide your students on the right path or to the level which you want your students to be comprehending information. As was pointed out in another post; it is very important for teachers to teach students using a step by step sequence in which the teacher will verbally explain activities or the lessons so that students will have a better understanding of what is being taught whether or not the student is a fast or a slow learner. This also helps teachers to monitor the progress of individual students where the grasping and comprehension of information is concerned.

This technique can be very good in building student’s self esteem where speaking out is concerned. I say this because I too am a student and I am or was one of those students who would not speak unless a question was directed at me. So, I do believe that the think-aloud technique is one which worked well for me, because it gave me a reason to speak out and it allowed the teacher to see that although I did not speak as much as she would want me to, I was on track with whatever was being taught.

As was said in another post, the think-aloud technique works well with the think-pair-share technique. I say this because it is my belief that while the think-aloud helps to guide all students onto the path in which you as the teacher wants your students to think, the think-pair-share technique will give the students the opportunity to showcase their understanding and usage of the method in groups of their own pairs.

As a teacher in training this blog has truly provided me with much to think about and utilize when I am faced with a class of students of my own.

I teach computing/technology skills to deaf students in K-12 grades

Although the topic is music

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Although the topic is music -- which is a high priority for the students I work with -- you got my attention when you said "We didn't need much language... "

Where I work, we communicate with our students through sign language and speech -- for a few who can benefit from it.. For a variety of reasons, many of our students come to us with limited proficiency in *any* language. So, I am always on the lookout for any tool that can help improve communication and increase comprehension.

Would you be kind enough to share a little more of what you are currently doing? Thank you.

Transformational Leadership Coach from Oakland, California

Thank you, Jamie, for this

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Thank you, Jamie, for this thoughtful reflection on my blog!

Seventh grade language arts teacher from Germantown/Collierville, TN

I have been working with

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I have been working with colleagues to become a better writing teacher. I have always just been able to write, and trying to break it down for students to learn has been a challenge for me. My PLC is currently working to help our students become more effective writers as we begin the transition from Tennessee state standards to the Common Core State Standards. This year, we are preparing our students not only to take the state standardized test, but also to take the PARCC assessments that our state will implement next year.

I have not really thought about using the think-aloud strategy to teach writing. I am going to take your article back to my PLC, and I am going to begin incorporating think-alouds in my writing instruction. Thank you!

third grade

I often use think alouds, it

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I often use think alouds, it is a great techniques especially for those struggling with "where to begin". I like to model the "struggling" process as well so the students can hear how I work through the steps. Modeling is key in showing what they need to do instead of telling them what to do with no clear guideline.

I teach preschool, so the

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I teach preschool, so the think aloud strategy is an essential to my students learning. We must explain in detail every step along the way. Our students struggle to follow along if we are not verbal when explaining an activity. They often need to visually see what each step looks like and hear how to complete each step.
Our students are just at the beginning of the writing process. They need us to write words for them to copy. The students verbally express their ideas and then we help them form their sentences and stories.
Thinking before talking is a very important skill to learn especially with the younger children. Another strategy that we use that is similar to think-aloud is think-pair-share in which the student thinks about his/her answer, then discusses with his/her partner, and finally shares it with the class.
Our students learn primarily through imitation and hands-on practice, which seems to be what the Balinese instructors were doing in their class. We spend a portion of our instruction doing hand over hand activities with students. I had an ELL student from Mexico this past school year and we used imitation as a primary tool when teaching him do to our lack of Spanish language knowledge.
“I wondered whose child he was as he moved from lap to lap, each Balinese adult laughing with him, encouraging him, clapping for him after he danced, and giving him instruction on his music as well.”
I loved the way the Balinese adults encouraged and praised the students as they worked through the activity. As a preschool teacher, we spend a lot of time praising our students and giving appropriate feedback as the students completed activities.
From this blog I gained some crucial insight into the way others teach and interact with students and how that relates to what I am doing as a teacher.

I made a point today to

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I made a point today to utilize this strategy as I read a story aloud to my third grade students. As I continue to try and implement this frequently, I will be interested to see if that becomes part of their discussion and strategies also. I will celebrate the first day I hear a student say...."Well -when I do this I think....." After reading several other posts I can see the importance of using this strategy more as I teach writing. Since younger students struggle to organize their thoughts, this could help them "think it through" if I think aloud.

I love the idea of using

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I love the idea of using "Think-Alouds" in writing lessons. My school district has required us to use them in our Shared Reading lessons (I teach 1st grade) and I have even found it beneficial to include them in my math lessons.

MS/HS Learning Support teacher

This is such a wonderful

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This is such a wonderful idea! So often we think our students comprehend our lessons and we can move on to the next topic, but what we need to realize is a "hands-on" approach is a lot more beneficial. As a teacher in special education, I'm thrilled to implement this idea into my daily plans.

My "take away" for this

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My "take away" for this discussion is that transparency provides clarity. So often in the classroom we think our message is clear, but it only seems clear because we conduct the task with such automaticity. When we force ourselves to "model" our thoughts it provides the students with a roadmap to follow. Paralleling that process to an apprenticeship gives a sense of working as partners to achieve the goal.

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