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Elementary school ESOL teacher

Hi Jose, You made some great

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Hi Jose,
You made some great points on teacher leadership. As you stated the "knowing your stuff" will make you credible. So be familiar with your leadership role. The other important pont that would be a way to set your self apart is by "creating something". i think this is definitely very good advice because you as a teacher leader you have to work hard and this would be the beginning of the leadership. I have never taken on a leadership role because I have always been afraid ot failing, and have insecurities of heading project. This does not mean I can't apply my ideas, and work with others. What do you recommend I do to try to overcome these feelings.

School Counselor, therapist and ADHD coach

@ Ryan - Often kids are not

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@ Ryan - Often kids are not trying because they are overwhelmed with life circumstances, disabilities, undiagnosed learning issues, etc. Sometimes teachers have a difficult time seeing that. Students may need to take baby steps towards re-engagement which can be hard in high school where time is of the essence. Focusing on making one change at a time is one way to approach the problem and show teachers that effort is being made.

I teach sustainable happiness.

I'm interested in teachers

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I'm interested in teachers and administrators as changemakers who are transforming themselves and education towards sustainability. I'd be interested to hear how you see teacher leadership aligning with a perspective I've shared in a recent blog on Bold Education:
http://sustainablehappiness.ca/sh-extra/bold-education/.

Producer LD Podcast, Digital Media Consultant, Author

Hi Ryan! I think it's

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Hi Ryan!

I think it's important to drill down into the questions and phrases people use. For example:
"They won't try." What does that mean?
Are the students afraid of looking dumb in front of their peers? Kids who are not good readers shouldn't be forced to read aloud to a whole group, but should be helped in smaller or one on one sessions until they feel comfortable. Teens who are having problems mastering material don;t want to be called out and found out in front of everyone else, and will often prefer to be disruptive than humiliated.

Are you asking them to share something that they don't or won't share with the whole class? Has the teacher earned the right to this knowledge? Often we give assignments like "Tell me about your family" in order to give kids something to write about, but that's also potentially intimate information kids might not want to share with the class. Maybe a grandparent is sick, or parents are fighting. That's not something that the teacher or other students need to know and may not have earned the trust needed in order to hear that sort of information.
What do we mean by try? Can they tell us exactly what they want the student to do in order to evaluate what "trying" means? Sometimes getting to school in the morning IS trying for a kid. Soemtimes not skipping class is trying. That doesn't mean you can't and shouldn't shoot for more, but putting smaller, more achievable, specific steps for kids to follow might make it easier for them to get to the goal line.
I think the thing we forget to teach most often are things like basic memory and study skills, and presentation skills. I see teachers all the time ask kids to put together a poster, for example, and then ding kids on things like neatness and poor organization, when they have never been taught those skills specifically- that's a catch 22 for kids, as you punish them for something you never taught or gave them an example so they have a benchmark to shoot for.
Likewise, we have to make asking for help as easy as possible for kids, since it means admitting they can't do it themselves alone. That's really hard for many of us, teachers included, and we should not make kids feel less than for needing or asking for additional support, ever.

School fundraising

Sadly, most heads need to be

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Sadly, most heads need to be good business managers and fundraisers to help draw in the much needed funds to fill the void left by ever decreasing budgets.
Barnaby@SchoolBears

Middle school math teacher and coach

Another approach might be to

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Another approach might be to help the student learn how to study, and giving them self-sufficiency and empowerment. In other words, they learn how to ask questions, take notes, work well, and ask for help after class. The student might have to do some of the legwork themselves if the colleagues won't help. In the meantime, you might want to share progress with how you're doing with that particular student and strategies for how to approach the student.

Student Success Facilitator (Dropout Prevention)

Thanks for the great

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Thanks for the great article!
In my position I am not a classroom teacher but am always working in the classroom with my students on my case load who have been targeted as "at risk" for dropping out. A problem that I often face is when asking for extra help or support for my students from the classroom teachers they often say there doing all they can for the student and are not willing to do more because many of these students do not try in their class.
What would be a good way for me to approach these teachers about how these students needing extra help from the classroom teachers?

Thanks Jose, for your

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Thanks Jose, for your realistic and challenging work for teachers who are thought-leaders in their local districts and communities! I will share your blog with groups of teachers I visit throughout the year. We must advocate for a shift in the work teachers do so they can more easily influence curriculum in schools!

I am pleased to read your

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I am pleased to read your advice and comments. I think it is useful advice. Especially the piece about keeping the energy going. Clicking on the link to your blog was also helpful. The do's and don'ts were interesting. Some generalizations, but good advice all the same.

I enjoyed reading your post.

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I enjoyed reading your post. The tips are very useful. I am a beginner teacher and leadership is a standard I am working on improving in. I felt intimidated by the experienced teachers on my team and became more of a follower. This year my goal is to be a leader. I appreciate your post and will keep these tips in mind on my journey to being a better leader.

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