Facebook
Edutopia on Facebook
Twitter
Edutopia on Twitter
Google+
Edutopia on Google+
Pinterest
Edutopia on Pinterest Follow Me on Pinterest
WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation
Steve Jobs shows off iPhone 4 at the 2010 Worldwide Developers Conference.

 

While many argue that the education system is too slow to change, Edutopia has documented schools around the country that have embraced Steve's passion and dedication to innovation. In honor of this American icon's passing, I'd like to suggest some ways that we can all remember -- and perhaps even continue Steve Job's legacy of passion and innovation.

1. Take Advantage of Apps for Learning

Applications or "apps" can be very effective in engaging students. Check out Apple's directory of thousands of apps specifically designed for learning. Plus, when you download an app, you instantly make learning mobile. iPad, iPod, iPhone -- whatever the device, you can learn on the go.

2. Go Mobile

Thanks to Apple, powerful new devices are available at lower cost, such as the iPod and iPod Touch. Check out how one school uses the iPod to help young English language-learners master reading, writing, and more.

3. Explore a One-to-One Program

More and more schools are investing in one-to-one programs. Blogger Andy Marcinek, wrote a series on how to implement a successful 1:1 environment. And take a peek at a school that integrates project-based learning within their 1:1 program to transform the learning process.

4. Check out a PadCamp (or start your own!)

This year, a new type of edcamp sprouted up called PadCamp, a free unconference all about the exploration of the use of tablets, e-readers & other handheld mobile devices in K-12 education. Here's a great series from one of the founders of EdCampPhilly (the first edcamp) on how to start your own edcamp.

5. Find a New Way to Assess

Portable digital devices can help you assess diverse learner's reading progress in different ways. Blogger Suzie Boss explains this strategy in her classroom guide, Ten Tips for Assessing Project-Based Learning (page 9).

6. Teach Your Students How to Produce Podcasts

Students across the country are producing an impressive variety of educational podcasts (audio recordings stored as MP3 files or in another format). Read how a fifth grade science teacher helps his students produce podcasts (through Apple's Garageband) to take his lessons outside of the classroom. Or take a look at directories such as the Education Podcast Network and iTunes U K-12 for ideas to get your students podcasting.

7. Discover Apple's Distinguished Educator (ADE) Program

Apple's ADE program helped pave the way to recognize educators who transform teaching and learning through mastery of technology. Google has also followed suit with their Google Teacher Academy and many many more tech companies have also helped elevate and recognize the teaching profession through credentialed programs like Apple's.

8. Engage Special Education Students

Mobile handheld technology have had success in engaging disabled or special education students. Check out Apple's many accessibility resources that includes assistive gaming and technology. And for those developers out there, you can also learn how and why it's important to make their applications accessible.

9. Use Apps to Develop Critical and Creative Thinking

There are many useful apps that can help develop students' higher order thinking skills. Blogger Diane Darrow highlights many apps that not only do this, but also connect to the various stages on Bloom's continuum of learning in her blog series.

10. Have Your Students Develop Apps

Creative problem solving, collaboration, and technology knowledge all intersect when you provide your students a challenge to build an app. Whether it be a Mac or Android app, we all know apps will be around for a while. Why not have your students dissect what an app really is made of and have them use that knowledge to solve a need creatively? Here's a useful blog post by educator Wes Fryer that aggregates developer resources. And check out this post by MakeUseOf that reveals how to develop a simple iPhone app. Lastly, there is a slough of resources in Apple's Developer Center including white papers, getting started resources, video tutorials and more. So . . . get developing!

Steve Jobs was a true visionary -- someone, who will not soon be forgotten. This morning I ran across author Seth Godin's tribute to Steve titled "Eulogy of Action," where Godin stated: "It's one thing to miss someone, to feel a void when they're gone. It's another to do something with their legacy, to honor them through your actions."

So I urge you to remember Steve Jobs by perhaps trying one of the ideas I suggested above, or trying your own idea. Please share what you're doing to remember him below and together we can help his spirit live on in education.

Comments (5)Sign in or register to postSubscribe to comments via RSS

Aubrey's picture

I find that these last few days Steve Jobs has been at the forefront of conversations both public and private. But what's most interesting is that students are so consumed by his passing. How we use his technology is so important. This weekend we're talking about taking the media coverage of Jobs and using it to teach students writing, rhetorical analysis and media literacy.
http://wheretheclassroomends.com/weekend-tech-steve-jobs

Allen Berg's picture
Allen Berg
curriculum and projects learning centers

Dear Elana and Aubrey,

Thank you! You are both right on about using Steve Jobs and the huge public response to his passing, as teaching tools in the classroom. That is exactly my intent by posting at our Arts Group and STEM Group immediate online resources.

His 2005 Stanford University Graduation speech on youtube (15 minutes) is one of the most profound and real and accessible and understandable graduation speeches of all time. There are already over 10 million views of it and for good reason... It truly is a Speech of a Lifetime! (and full text is available online also from Stanford, just type it at google...) It has just 3 simple yet profound true stories from his extraordinary life and works.

In college (and in high school) we call this a "personal essay or speech" - just make a simple outline of it and you will see its brilliance and humanity - pure.

The link to his 2 portraits (from my wikispace) show a young yoga-sitting Silicon Valley inventor/entrepreneur (he had already lived in India for a year)and then the elder CEO "in memorium" Apple Logo design portrait by a 19 year old graphic arts student from Hong Kong.

"Compare and Contrast" and discuss "composing" and "creating" the students' own portraits (of Steve Jobs or other people), using images, cameras, words, symbols, actions, goals, accomplishments, values, etc.
"How can and could you "portray" a person you know...?"

So many students own Apple devices and/or these are in your classrooms/school,
that they can consider using them to "make media" and/or creative expressions/responses to Steve Jobs' life and impact on their daily lives...

The New York Times obituary article from October 5, 2011 is a complete amazing biography of Steve Jobs... My link is already "timed-out" by the online newspaper--as is their policy--but you can probably find and copy the "printer-formatted" text by going to the NYTimes website ans going to the Obituary Page and then scroll down till you find his article. It will surprise you with extraordinary details of his life as a child, etc.
okay, enough for now... keep the conversation going..You both are wonderful teachers, thank you for posting your blog and message(s)...

Sincerely,
Allen

ps: Time magazine will have a special issue this week about him...

Elana Leoni's picture
Elana Leoni
Director of Social Media Strategy and Marketing @Edutopia, edcamp organizer
Staff

Thanks for your comment and really great idea Aubrey. If you haven't seen this, I think you might enjoy it. It's with Martin Scorsese talking about media literacy: http://www.edutopia.org/martin-scorsese-teaching-visual-literacy-video.

Thanks again,
Elana

[quote]I find that these last few days Steve Jobs has been at the forefront of conversations both public and private. But what's most interesting is that students are so consumed by his passing. How we use his technology is so important. This weekend we're talking about taking the media coverage of Jobs and using it to teach students writing, rhetorical analysis and media literacy.

http://wheretheclassroomends.com/weekend-tech-steve-jobs[/quote]

Elana Leoni's picture
Elana Leoni
Director of Social Media Strategy and Marketing @Edutopia, edcamp organizer
Staff

Hi Allen -

Thanks so much for your thoughtful comment. I also watched Jobs' Stanford Graduation Speech and was very inspired. You're right..it was a speech of a lifetime. Your ideas to engage the classroom are also really useful.

All the best,
Elana

[quote]Dear Elana and Aubrey,

Thank you! You are both right on about using Steve Jobs and the huge public response to his passing, as teaching tools in the classroom. That is exactly my intent by posting at our Arts Group and STEM Group immediate online resources.

His 2005 Stanford University Graduation speech on youtube (15 minutes) is one of the most profound and real and accessible and understandable graduation speeches of all time. There are already over 10 million views of it and for good reason... It truly is a Speech of a Lifetime! (and full text is available online also from Stanford, just type it at google...) It has just 3 simple yet profound true stories from his extraordinary life and works.

In college (and in high school) we call this a "personal essay or speech" - just make a simple outline of it and you will see its brilliance and humanity - pure.

The link to his 2 portraits (from my wikispace) show a young yoga-sitting Silicon Valley inventor/entrepreneur (he had already lived in India for a year)and then the elder CEO "in memorium" Apple Logo design portrait by a 19 year old graphic arts student from Hong Kong.

"Compare and Contrast" and discuss "composing" and "creating" the students' own portraits (of Steve Jobs or other people), using images, cameras, words, symbols, actions, goals, accomplishments, values, etc.

"How can and could you "portray" a person you know...?"

So many students own Apple devices and/or these are in your classrooms/school,

that they can consider using them to "make media" and/or creative expressions/responses to Steve Jobs' life and impact on their daily lives...

The New York Times obituary article from October 5, 2011 is a complete amazing biography of Steve Jobs... My link is already "timed-out" by the online newspaper--as is their policy--but you can probably find and copy the "printer-formatted" text by going to the NYTimes website ans going to the Obituary Page and then scroll down till you find his article. It will surprise you with extraordinary details of his life as a child, etc.

okay, enough for now... keep the conversation going..You both are wonderful teachers, thank you for posting your blog and message(s)...

Sincerely,

Allen

ps: Time magazine will have a special issue this week about him...[/quote]

Elana Leoni's picture
Elana Leoni
Director of Social Media Strategy and Marketing @Edutopia, edcamp organizer
Staff

Just came across this resource on Twitter: iPad Literacy Program Increases Reading & Writing Ability: http://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2011/10/ipad-literacy-program-...

It mentions a program called, "Footsteps2Brilliance." More on this program:

Footsteps2Brilliance (F2B) is an impressive educational game platform that supports students in prek - 3rd grade in learning to read and write. Their Academic Language Program for Students (ALPS) teaches young children the 1,000 key words they will need to develop a powerful reading and writing vocabulary through animated ebooks and games. There is a back end management system tracks mastery of each child's vocabulary and comprehension development as well as standards-based concepts. The program was developed in response to the landmark Hart-Risley study on language development that shows that an underprivileged child enters school with 25% of the vocabulary they need to succeed academically. This program helps to rectify this situation by creating a language rich environment for all children.

Sign in and Join the Discussion! Not a member? Register to join the discussion.