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7th and 8th Grade Family and Consumer Science Teacher Bedford, NH

Students need the tools to

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Students need the tools to begin to think critically and to problem solve. Common Core is a necessary foundation in providing those tools. How students use their tools is up to us. We, as educators, need to coach, give feedback, model, set expectations, and design assessments that will allow students to move beyond basic recall.

As Wiggins quotes in Educative Assessment, “Assessment is authentic when we anchor testing in the kind of work real people do, rather than merely eliciting easy-to-score responses to simple questions.” Students can identify sifters, spatulas,and pastry cutters but if they do not know what to do with them, why would they need to identify them? Authentic assessment is true performance.

High school math teacher

American education is

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American education is currently undergoing a great change. The techniques we have been using for the past ten years are going to have to change if we wish to survive in the teaching profession. With so many technological advances, we are going to have to let go of the methods of teaching that we experienced when we were in school and embrace the use of technology. However, I doubt teachers will stop teaching towards the test, especially with the possibility of teachers being assessed based on student performance on standardized tests.

Junior and Senior Language arts Teacher, North Dakota

Agreed

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Lucas, I agree with you and the article 100%. The days of teachers being "the sage on the stage" are numbered. Teachers should no longer be the gatekeepers of information, desseminating it as they see fit. Instead, teachers need to facilitate students' learning, giving them the strategies that will best foster their "mastery of skills in action."

I agree that students need to

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I agree that students need to do more ciritical thinking in the classroom. Performance-based tests seem to be a good alternative to asking basic questions that students just learn for the moment. If the students can collaborate on a project and use other critical thinking skills it will help them retain the information better. I also agree with the quote from Yong Zhao. I do feel that creativity is not used as much in the classroom as it could be. The world is always changing and our students need to be challenged.

High School Math Teacher from Minneapolis, MN

I was immediately hooked by

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I was immediately hooked by your post when you spoke of the use (or lack of) technology in the classroom, specifically assessments. I admit that I am one of those teachers that cringe when a student wants to use their cell phone or iPod to help them on an assignment. I think it stems from the administrative stance on technology. I think we need to just become more educated about what technology can do and how we, as educators, can enhance a students experience by using it. One way around the dilemma of students using technology would be to ask more higher order questions that require critical thinking. These are answers that students are not going to be able to just find online. My main concern with using technology during an assessment is to ensure that students are not leaking information about the test to others. Any ideas?

High School English Teacher

Good reminder

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This blog post offers an excellent reminder of how the goal of education has changed: there is not a static body of knowledge to simply transfer today; instead, we need to encourage critical thinking skills. If students can just "Google" the answer and find it quickly, it is too literal and not likely to be remembered beyond the test. Students need to work with it and dig into real questions and skills by researching, analyzing, and synthesizing information from several places. Students should use technology to help solve questions and higher-level thinking. This provides real-life applications regardless of the discipline or job students will have later in life.

High school social studies teacher

I like the idea of the using

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I like the idea of the using more performance based assessment. It lets the student direct their learning more, keeping them more motivated. The biggest issue for me is that the school I teach in shares two computer labs. How do I move forward with this more investigative style of learning with such limited access?

sci edu advisor, researcher and writer

Googleable questions

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This Google argument is excellent! It is in my toolbox already.

Educator, Consultant, ADE , ClassTechTips.com

Instead of multiple choice

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Instead of multiple choice tests, I like to have students prove that they are a master of a concept - here's an easy way to do it: http://wp.me/p2qsME-6Q

middle school history teacher

I agree that assessments

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I agree that assessments should reflect the new availability of information. And perhaps evaluating sources will help to keep students from confusing the juxtaposition of images on the web with the reality of place and time. For example, a student might go to the Wikipedia page on the Gupta Empire and find a picture of Borobudur to illustrate their essay without noting that Borobudur, built some 300 years after the end of the Gupta Empire, is located in Java, Indonesia. Islands, volcanoes, and monsoons, but no permafrost.

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