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I know that teachers struggle

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I know that teachers struggle with the gradual release of responsibility in the classroom. It's moving from the "sage on the stage" mentality of doing it all to an activator of learning from the side and it requires a change in one's approach to teaching, which drives the learning in the classroom. It's all about the learning and creating the environment to sustain this culture is critical to the future of education.

Thanks for the great feedback

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Thanks for the great feedback from everyone.

The idea that learning is a culture alludes to the habits, networks, people, curiosities, emotion, and affection that all meaningful learning includes.

Sustained, authentic learning not only behaves like a culture, but is embedded in one. One of the biggest mistakes education continues to make is to dehumanize the process. The need to learn begins in a community, and ends up there as well. From this community, people carry with them stories, insecurities, interests, and other strands of living that can act as powerful schema in the learning process.

Or that's how I see it anyway. Not sure there is one "right" answer! Love the thinking, as always!

Educator & Writer - Providing tools for success in School & Life

Maybe learning isn't a

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Maybe learning isn't a culture, but the advice that is provided is valuable. Students become proactive members of the classroom when learning is facilitated in such a manner. When young people are engaged and encouraged to contribute and collaborate, learning becomes deeply personal and beneficial. I think that's what matters most. Thanks, Terry, for sharing this with us.

I agree, I also believe that

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I agree, I also believe that it is not a culture. Culture is a way of thinking and it can change depending on the environment that you are in. We act and learn different things everyday and our beliefs come from home or what we've been taught at home.

Have to agree with others,

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Have to agree with others, Learning is not a culture. Learning is from what Brain sees from eyes.

They could create their own language in classroom but it isn't going to be easy because it takes lot of practice...

7th and 8th grade Social Studies teacher in Grand Rapids, MI

I have the problem with the

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I have the problem with the "Let Them" part of this. I find it hard to get out of their way and trust that they will push forward. I need to get over this problem with myself.
I do think that the structure of this system (a topic, a community, a project idea, an app, and a problem worth solving) is great. This is what I try to do in my SS classroom. Hook them with an issue in the world (local, national, or global) and teach from there. Let the events they show interest in direct the instruction. It calls for a lot of flexibility in teaching, but the students like to feel they are learning what is really going on and not being forced the content of the day.

Learning is not a culture. A

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Learning is not a culture.

A culture is "a way of thinking, behaving, or working that exists in a place or organization".

One can seek to establish a classroom culture that values and encourages learning, and makes its attainment something that everyone celebrates. Such efforts are most effective when they are explicit, and adopted by all participants rather than just one change agent.

'demonstrate the

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'demonstrate the think-alouds' - a fantastically powerful technique. Teachers should also not be afraid to show students when things go wrong - let them see your workings, and how you edit them to improve them. As always Terry, a great piece.

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