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Elementary general music specialist, Maryland

Karin, thank you for this

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Karin, thank you for this wonderful article about teaching the common core through the arts. I am a K-5 general music teacher and, like many of those who posted here, definitely believe in the value of arts integration. I heard it explained once that education is not a hallway full of doors wherein behind door number one is history, and this room houses math, reading behind this door, and so forth. Rather, education and our minds are constructed more like a street fair where everything—from the proverbial smells in the air to the carousel music to the cries of the game masters—contributes to our total experience and understanding.

Language arts do not stand in isolation, nor do science or social studies. Our full understanding as individuals and learners is the composite of the sum of our experiences and knowledge. Thank you for taking the time to offer practical, easily manageable suggestions for classroom teachers to create greater connections through Common Core State Standards. I am delighted to have stumbled upon this article just in time for a presentation on infusing the arts into the general education classroom that I am giving to new teachers in our county. I will post a link to this site under resources. Again, thank you!

Executive Director, Founder of Arts & Learning Conservatory

A student of all era groups

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A student of all era groups needs some or the other kind of awareness pertaining to art, etc. which helps student increase knowledge about every sphere of life and provides all of these without fail. Hence, it is quintessential.
http://www.artsandlearning.org/

State Director of Arts Education, New Hampshire Dept. of Education

Joan's comment about "more is

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Joan's comment about "more is better" when it comes to arts education sits well with me. Because arts provide students with pathways to discover their world and the world of others while expressing who they are, their observations, thoughts and ideas in ways that transcend words and numbers, the more opportunities provided to students, the better. If the goal of language arts is literacy, and if the goal of mathematics is numeracy, then the goal of arts education is logically artistic literacy. For students to be artistically literate, one is required to engage with the arts through artistic processes of creating, presenting/producing/performing, responding, and connecting. This occurs most predominately in classrooms where arts is primary--but also occurs when quality arts integration is in place (which I view as quality teaching--how else do teachers reach all students, differentiate for all learners, and address Universal Design for learning...?). In school, after school, with the support of community arts partners--yes, more is better. Two websites to visit for more information include seadae.org and nccas.wikispaces.com.

President and Founder of PlayTheGroove.com

Hi Karin - really nice thread

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Hi Karin - really nice thread you've planted and fertilized. Kudos. Jumping on Becky's points, I have a question on the reverse. As a secondary music specialist in rhythm-section based modern world styles, do you see all of the core subjects (math, history, science and English...) coming into the music classroom as well? My concern is TIME. CCSS is a new learning curve, reverse integration can be a stretch ... music and the arts takes a lot of time to impart and I wouldn't like to see more distractions for any teacher - personal accountability yes, but where is the line? Is there a line?

Music professor at the University of Arizona and former K-12 music teacher

Debora, Thank you for

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Debora,
Thank you for sharing. The Art and Learning Conservatory looks like an amazing program for our youth in the field of theatre, music, and dance. Best of luck and thanks for reading!
Karin

Executive Director, Founder of Arts & Learning Conservatory

Besides studies, a student of

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Besides studies, a student of all age group needs some or the other kind of knowledge pertaining to art, etc. This helps student gain knowledge about every sphere of life. Art and Learning Conservatory provides all of these without fail. Hence, it is quintessential.
http://www.artsandlearning.org/

Music professor at the University of Arizona and former K-12 music teacher

Laura, Very Inspirational! I

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Laura,
Very Inspirational! I think many of us arts educators have that transformational moment where we witness the power that the arts have on our students. I believe that creating truly effective and memorable lesson plans means integrating drama, visual arts, creative movement, and music into as many subjects as possible. Thanks for sharing!
Karin

teacher, college adjunct

The broader the educational

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The broader the educational exposure the more neuron development. And of course the benefit is not limited to music. Music teaches us many things mathematical. In my time at a corporate tech ed center we regularly recruited liberal arts grads to join our six week bootcamp program to become programmers. Not surprisingly many of the best were degreed as artists or musicians.

Director, Antioch Center for School Renewal

As a former arts educator

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As a former arts educator (theatre), I obviously think that the arts have value both in and of themselves AND as a conduit to other content areas. Theatre teaches about honesty, empathy, presence and awareness- all of which play a role in understanding literature and history, not to mention their role in helping one to be a successful member of the human race!

I didn't always get that, though. For years I saw my role as one of producer/ director/ coach, with my English classes requiring a different set of skills. Then one day I ran across an amazing lesson plan online for Hemingway's "Hills LIke White Elephants." (I can't find it now to link to- it was back in the early, dial-up days of the web, so I don't even know if the site is around anymore) This short story is a sticky one for kids to read on the page- lost of subtext and pauses that Hemingway intentionally doesn't fill or note. The lesson plan suggested having two students act out the scene (with no rehearsal, just the story in front of them), with the teacher and other students stopping the performance to question and deconstruct the action.

It was the first time EVER that I've had kids really get that story. It not only changed the way I viewed English instruction, it changed the way I viewed the web. I guess it was the moment I became a connected arts educator, now that I think about it...

Director, Education Division, Creativity & Associates

I agree that the arts are of

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I agree that the arts are of value in their own right. I also believe that arts integration is of value in its own right. In schools that don't have the arts, I think that bringing in community artists to work with teachers to develop arts integrated lessons is a great gateway to having the arts fully present in the school. An arts-rich school has a strong cadre of certified arts teachers in all disciplines, community artists visiting the school, students visiting arts institutions and arts integration (where it works well) in the non-arts classrooms. More is better in this case.

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