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7th gr LA teacher

I just had this discussion

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I just had this discussion with some colleagues today! As VA just passed legislation to reduce the number of state assessments for 3rd, 5th, 6th, and 7th graders, we started talking about all of the problems with standardized tests. One issue we discussed was the multiple-choice format. We all agreed that the format isn't the best way to test students because they can guess and still get right answers. It's not a true test of what the students know. We also discussed the problems with the cultural biases that can exist with multiple-choice tests (a whole different topic than this one). I wish that tests had more writing to them so students would have to provide support and elaboration to show what they know about topics. Less room for guessing and getting correct answers, and more room to really demonstrate knowledge.

Science Evangelist

Thanks for your

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Thanks for your response.

That comment was a bit of hyperbole, but I believe I found a phrase with that sentiment in the OECD literature when I was investigating PISA scores. You might find statistics there (http://www.oecd.org/unitedstates/). Wish I could help more.

I am doing research on the

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I am doing research on the history and use of the multiple-choice test around the world. What is your support for the statement, "the United States is one of the most tested countries in the world"? I would love to see some statistics but haven't been able to track them down in my own research.

Not a big fan of multiple

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Not a big fan of multiple choice, not as teacher nor was I a fan as a student many, many years ago. I find project base assessment a more effective tool for evaluating what my students have learned. Additionally this types of assessment provokes critical thinking on a higher cognitive level.
And you are a correct it is profitable to know the origin of things. Thanks for the info

World history teacher from the Dominican Republic

While I do not condone the

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While I do not condone the use of multiple choice testing I strongly believe that it is not the most efficient. I find project based assessments and document based questions to be more effective in evaluating my students. I feel that when I give these types of assessments I gain in depth understanding of my students' view point and understanding as oppose to just checking off correct or incorrect answers.

But of COURSE it comes down

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But of COURSE it comes down to race and country of origin ... doesn't everything? *sigh*

audlt basic education

Numerous strategic goals

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Numerous strategic goals within our current education community promote critical thinking as we prepare students to compete in a 21st century global society. The use of multiple-choice testing in prominent k-12 testing such as Standards of Learning, and state End of Grade testing does nothing to promote critical thinking or give weight its importance.

Director, Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research

Very, very, very few people

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Very, very, very few people know how to write a multiple choice that provides meaningful insight into student thinking. Slightly fewer people know how to interpret results.

Wowzers offers online Game-based Math curriculum for Grades 3-8

The Smarter Balanced Common

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The Smarter Balanced Common Core assessments are taking the multiple choice test and tweeking it somewhat, adding an adaptive feature that recognizes students incorrect and correct answers and adjusts the test to their ability levels.

Adaptive testing is nothing new (GRE, etc), but it is a new concept for many K12 students. To learn more about preparing for Smarter Balanced's Computer Adaptive testing features, check out this blog post - http://blog.wowzers.com/bid/274046/Smarter-Balanced-States-Get-Ready-for...

Science Evangelist

Use with caution

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Everyone can choose whether they want to use multiple choice tests or not. I just think we ought to know where they come from.

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