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Thanks for this post. I got

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Thanks for this post. I got so mush idea from some comments. I'm gonna pass this on to my friends. :)

Lea (not verified)

YouTube in the Classroom

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This is a very good and valid point that I never considered until now! As a future teacher, I instinctively would be hesitant to use clips from sites such as YouTube because of the possibility of inappropriate material. But yes, students are viewing this stuff everyday on their own on TV, in the news, and over the internet. This is not to say, however, that I would promote the use of such material without first viewing it for appropriate content.

ErinT (not verified)

SchoolTube.com

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I really enjoy using SchoolTube.com, a moderated video sharing site for K-12 students, teachers, and parents. They are a little more student friendly, but they've got lots of resources for teachers too.
What's neat about SchoolTube is that no videos are viewable on the site until they are approved by a teacher or SchoolTube staff.

Chris ONeal (not verified)

I would do a few things to

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I would do a few things to verify...
1. There are lots of videos on YouTube that do violate copyright laws, and I'd steer completely clear of those, of course.
2. If it appears that the video in question is an original video, you might just email the person who uploaded it, asking them for permission.
3. Unless the uploader is an actual company which you can clearly determine holds the copyright and can grant you permission, I would certainly not do anymore with it than show it during a lesson. Don't distribute it, copy it, keep it beyond the lesson, show it outside the classroom, or show it in any event/surrounding in which a cost is associated, and I think you at least are attempting to not blatantly violate copyright laws.

I have emailed several individual users who have uploaded their own content (home movies, vacation footage of national or historic places, etc.) and just asked them if I could show their video to students, and so far have gotten all positive responses.

I'm not a lawyer, by any stretch, so best to read up on the latest. Here are a few sources of information:
http://www.copyrightaware.gov.au/pathways/teachers/mean.html
http://www.google.com/support/youtube/bin/topic.py?topic=10550

carolw (not verified)

Youtube and copyright laws

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My concern is copyright laws. If we show a Youtube video for a valid content-based lesson, could we be sued?

Former Senior Technical Producer, Edutopia

A good concern

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There have been reports of viruses attached to videos, but generally speaking they seem to have been mainly social engineering type hacks ( "Watch this video then download the software seen in the video"). However, that seems to be changing. Here's a relevant article:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071002/ap_on_hi_te/cybersecurity

Sue (not verified)

YouTube Question

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Are the videos on YouTube safe to view? What are the possibilities that viruses are attached the the videos?

B Sherry (not verified)

Teacher Tube

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Other place to look for resources and to have students producing is:

http://www.teachertube.com

brian619 (not verified)

YouTube in the classroom

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I agree with other educators who have commented that we need to help students be ready to think critically about the various messages that they will be exposed to through all of the types of media that will be employed. Higher order thinking skills are what will be most required of them, and practicing how to think critically is essential. By guiding the students in differentiating between quality and trash, we will be taping into powerful discussion and thought processing.
When students use our computer lab and we are using the internet, they know to quickly raise their hand if a web site opens for them that is of questionable content. Our firewall has been doing a really good of late, however once in a while something slips through. Very young children understand when they are viewing objectionable material. While at school their viewing content can at least be moderated by the classroom teacher.
I wouldn’t post video footage of my students to a site like youtube. If individuals want to put themselves into the public forum to that extent, then I feel they should be allowed to do it, however my responsibility is to provide a safe learning environment for my students, and putting their images into the public to that extent is beyond my comfort threshold.

H. Avanesian (not verified)

It's a have to!

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I believe that using all these new things that are available are a have to for us educators. If we educators don't do it children will use them them any way, so it would be nice to use them to educate our future generation. Just like books, they can be educational or they can be not educational the reading and writing is taught in schools. Therefor, we need to introduce new technology and we need to use them to teach more effectively and most important, we can teach students to use technology to self-teach themselves in a right way, to seek information and to post comments on issues that are important to them and their society.

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Chris O'Neal Educational consultant and former Edutopia.org blogger

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