Comments (3)

Comment RSS
Dawn Grobe (not verified)

Even as a Educational

Was this helpful?
0
Even as a Educational Technology Specialist, I am not a big fan of the 1:1 as a wide-spread solution. If I were to leave my school and go to one with a 1:1, that would be fine, but I have too much trouble at my school convincing the teachers (not the kids) that computers are tools not toys. There would have to be a great shift in attitude before 1:1 would work for everyone. A school in my district has 1:1 in 3-6 Grade and it is working well for those teachers who really bought into it, but still others are dragging their heels. On the other hand, I also feel that usually a pencil and paper, a book or a magazine, and some actual physical manipulatives is still very important in Elementary School.
Christy (not verified)

In my classroom teaching

Was this helpful?
0
In my classroom teaching experience, the best example our district came up with to provide one-to-one access to technology was its use of Alpha-Smarts. These were simple word-processing machines our middle-schoolers used. They were durable and lightweight, which made them user friendly. They could be hooked up to a printer to print whatever document the child created. The problem was that there was only one printer for each hallway, which meant a computer class would have to be disrupted as I would send kids down to the printer. During my last year there, each department had a classroom set of 30 Alpha-Smarts available. This is not quite one-to-one access, but each student did have his/her own password. This enabled students to save his/her work and then just access it later. Now I work for a virtual online school called Connections Academy. It varies by state, but in my state (Ohio), we provide a computer and an internet subsidy to each of our students. This is the best example of one-to-one access that I have experienced.
see more see less