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WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation

K-12 Education Tips & Strategies That Work

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You'll find practical classroom strategies and tips from real educators, as well as lesson ideas, personal stories, and innovative approaches to improving your teaching practice. If you have any thoughts or comments about these blogs, please don't hesitate to let us know.

When students created a toolkit to help their peers break the system of bullying, their passion drove effective collaboration on a thoughtful, high-quality product.
In schools and at home, journaling is often a solo experience. See what happens when students in a middle school art class start collaboratively working in each other's sketch journals.
Vicki Davis @coolcatteacher October 13, 2014
A quick look at game modalities can help you approach game-based learning via single- or multiplayer, one-time or persistent, game or simulation . . .
The mindset for game-based learning begins with setting up student expectations for recognition and reward. And remember, this isn't about grades (at least not directly).
Blogger Eric Brunsell takes us on a tour of his favorite online resources for science teachers.
Middle school ELA teacher Laura Bradley describes how the National Novel Writing Month Project turned her eighth-graders into motivated, inspired novelists.
Welcome to Brightworks, an independent school that functions as an open laboratory of hands-on engagement with teachers and students as partners in discovery.
To better leverage digital professional development, schools must allocate more time, reimagine their ecosystem, update training methods, change their culture, redefine leadership, and encourage mentorship.
Elana Leoni, Edutopia's Social Media Marketing Manager, shares ten tips to become a connected educator -- including making the time to connect, following educators you respect, and being open to making mistakes.
A good educational game offers engagement, assessment, and learning, with the game data providing a valuable invisible assessment opportunity for students, teachers, and parents.

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