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Biology / MicroBiology Instructor

Laura, I think you are

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Laura,
I think you are absolutely right about maintaining focus on the outcome. I like Quinn's six questions, these are very much like what I ask myself whenever I start in on a new project.
Personally, I find clear and fair assessment to be the most difficult thing to convince myself of. Whenever I have shared my books with kids of the appropriate age (the on on the market is for ~2nd grade), they have really enjoyed the story, but would spontaneously work together to solve the problems (it includes review questions at various points through the story).

Biology / MicroBiology Instructor

Yes - I'm in for any

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Yes - I'm in for any collaboration on this. As I said below, I do have one zombie-math iBook out and another that is finished and just needs to be compiled and submitted. I would be extremely happy to work on any additional projects with any who are interested.

Adjunct Math TEacher

Awesome idea! I have many

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Awesome idea! I have many thoughts. too numerous to name here. If anyone is interested in doing this let me know. I think math can be amazingly boring if not approached from a certain entertainment aspect.. Why not try t teach the students in ways they are interested and at the same time educational!

Director, Antioch Center for School Renewal

I love the creative aspect of

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I love the creative aspect of this- what a great way to hook kids into the content. I've seen teachers do similar things with alien invasions and crime scene investigation- all to good effect. I think the important thing to keep in mind when one goest down this kind of road is that the learning goals have to be really clear for the teacher- and for the students- else they get muddled up with the cool factor and get lost. I like Quinn's Six Questions as a tool for that- http://schoolreforminitiative.org/doc/quinns_six.pdf

I also like to make sure I have clear Quality Criteria upfront when I get into a more complex project. By specifically describing the form (what the work will look like), the process (what skills or dispositions students will be demonstrating while they create the product or participate in the lesson) and the content (what knowledge or content they'll show they know), I'm less like likely to get lost in the weeds when it comes time for assessment.

Thanks for sharing this!

Social media for e-learning & technology

An interesting article 'Dawn

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An interesting article 'Dawn of the Dunce: Zombie-based learning' http://blog.quib.ly/2013/06/27/dawn-of-the-dunce-zombie-based-learning/

Grade 12 English, Literature and Bible teacher in Abbotsford, BC

Zombies and Englsih Literature

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I've been thinking that I would use zombies as the philosophical backdrop to 20th century poetry and prose -- If you accept my thesis (http://trentdejong.com/zombies-are-the-monsters-for-our-time-monsters-an...) then T. S. Elliot's "Hollow Men" (and Camus' The Stranger and The Plague) is a zombie poem. Of course, I am exaggerating the link, but this poem literary works share the same concern as Romero's Night of the Living Dead. My idea would be to start the a survey of Literature with Romero's zombies, and then go back to Anglo-Saxon asking the question, 'How did we get from Beowulf to Zombies?" A quick summary of my thesis is at http://www.squidoo.com/the-meaning-of-zombies2. If anyone has a suggestion as to what piece of literature would be good to end my course with -- some 20th century work that insists that human beings aren't zombies -- please let me know. I was thinking Tolkien, but that's not really in the canon. Any ideas?

Marketing Director for educational app developer, gWhiz LLC.

Study with Zombies!

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For another Zombies fix, check out the latest twist on mobile test prep from gWhiz. Our PrepZilla app allows users to study on their own or invite friends to study along with them. And with the addition of the latest gaming feature, Zombies!, users who choose to study on their own can challenge themselves to beat the clock and improve their score, or risk becoming one of the undead! It's serious fun.

Psychology teacher and host of The Psych Files podcast

Zombies and Psychology

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I am also a fan of the zombie genre and I recently created an episode on my psychology podcast in which I talk about how a variety of psychologists might explain our fascination with zombies - from Freud to the parts of the brain. Lots of fun I think. Teachers might find some good ideas for the classroom: http://www.thepsychfiles.com/1621/episode-138-zombies-6-reasons-why-are-...

Biology / MicroBiology Instructor

Great article. Zombies do, of

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Great article. Zombies do, of course, have a part in education. See my iBook, In Parts: A tale of fractional zombies at https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/in-parts/id615486016?mt=11
that uses zombie invasion as a convenient way to teach fractions. "What proportion of that zombie is still left?"

Eons ago - I'm now retire - I

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Eons ago - I'm now retire - I purchased a jello mold of a brain and had more fun with my classes with it. Being an English teacher, it was used when learning to write descriptive paragraphs (using the five senses). At times I used it when challenging the students -- Who thinks he needs more brains? Who is willing to try something different?
As an at-risk principal, we would do "themed" learning on Halloween -- yes, we used the brain when discussing science and transplantation of organs.
This was especially fun for staff to watch the reaction of various students. (The recipe given with the mold makes for realistic looking brains. I also sprinkled a little olive oil over the top to make it look fresh.) Some students were very bold. Others threatened to report me to their parents. Some wanted to know if they were raw or cooked. It's amazing what the mind can convince the body to do. Some swallowed their piece whole.
some munched on it. Others gagged at the thought of putting a piece in their mouths, even after fellow students exclaimed it tasted like raspberry -- no maybe it's orange -- I think it tasted like lemon!
The gist is, be creative. Pay attention to what students are paying attention to in their lives. Experiment. Have some fun.

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