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Love the idea of altruistic consequence.

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I love the idea of altruistic consequence. All children want to belong, and deep down, want to help others. Being able to identify with those who have a similar path is not only preventative, but brings out positive relationships in the very children who are marked as "troubled" kids.

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I agree with you.

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I agree with you.

I like the idea of the

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I like the idea of the Altruism Consequence and see how it can work. I know for me I teach freshman so they essentially are the youngest at my school. I have a couple kids that will do anything for attention and I don't want to make them the focus of our class because that will just encourage the behavior. Since I don't have the buddy system to install with my group I have decided to give the kids who are the distractors their own role or responsibility. It is a similar idea in that it places some responsibility and ownership on them and they have been responding really well. I feel like it keeps them on task and I can praise them instead of correcting them all the time.

Teacher for students with behavioral disabilities .

Altruism Consequence

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The altruism consequence sounds like a great idea. Essentially you are killing two birds with one stone. I teach three different grade levels so this will come in handy. The older student is asked to monitor the behaviors of the younger student. The great thing is that the older student will probably not exhibit the behavior that he/she is asked to monitor on the younger student.

High School English and Social Studies teacher from St. Louis, MO

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Both the 'golden relationships' and the 'altruism consequence' methods of inclusion /safety are used successfully in my district. While gangs are not a real issue in the district, we are a suburban, fairly wealthier district that does bus in inner-city students to the middle and high schools. Because of this, it is especially important to make all of the students feel welcome, connected, and safe. The "golden relationships" method has been used with great success in our elementary and middle schools. While the program's main goal is to provide the students with community service opportunities, as opposed to the author's goal of reforming troubled youth, the program does, in my opinion, accomplish this goal as well. While not outright defined as "troubled" students, I have seen many resistant students (or those with more behavior issues than normal) really respond positively to working with their elderly friends. They really get excited about it and want to have a good grade or accomplishment to show them on their next visit.
With regards to the "Altruism Consequence, we also actively use the "buddy" program in our elementary schools and the "link crew program" in our high school. The buddy program pairs an older student with a younger one and allows the students to work together and mentor each other throughout the year. The Link Crew groups freshmen and upperclassmen together to help make the transition to high school easier and less frightening. Both programs, in my experience, have been extremely beneficial for all students involved. The students feel welcome and involved, while making new friends in the school.
Overall, I do agree with the author's thesis that we need to focus our attention on including and making the "less-socially-inclined" students feel welcome in our schools and classrooms. It is, unfortunately, a reality that these are the students who act out because of poor home lives, meaning they need us all that much more.

Middle and high school teacher in Riceville, IA

At-risk

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In our rural community we do not have "gangs", but every school has at-risk students. Students that are set up to fall through the cracks in the system are a challenge to any teacher whether it be due to low self-esteem, motivation, or a challenging home life. Some days it is difficult to make these students feel welcome, but that is exactly what they need. Many times just the fact that the teacher takes time to ask the student how they are doing as they enter the classroom can set the stage for how the class will go. Showing one cares by allowing them to be themselves through class interaction, yet setting expectations of how to do this creates a safe environment for the student.

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