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Author of Five Big Ideas for Effective Teaching-Mind, Brain and Education

Ava, thank you for your kind

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Ava, thank you for your kind comment. We will check out this resource.

Author of Five Big Ideas for Effective Teaching-Mind, Brain and Education

Michele, Many thanks for your

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Michele, Many thanks for your thoughtful post and for your initiative to work with your K-5 team to work on this process. We have found that when students and educators become metacognitive about whether they are focused internally (on self talk) or externally on what others are saying, they can more effectively manage their attention. All the best! Please keep us posted about your work on this!

Author of Five Big Ideas for Effective Teaching-Mind, Brain and Education

Victoria, It's Marcus here.

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Victoria, It's Marcus here. Thanks for your comment. Please send an e-mail confirming how you would like to use this strategy. The e-mail should come to donna@ciep.org.

1st Grade Teacher in SW Washington

Dear Donna, I thought your

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Dear Donna,
I thought your research and theory of HEAR is excellent! You and Marcus Conyers did an excellent job on nailing down the essential components of becoming excellent listeners. The acronym is very "kid-friendly" that will even appeal to younger students!

Likewise, I also enjoyed your definition of noise. Noise in student's minds can adversely affect their performance in the classroom.

I love your statement about, "Learning to listen well is a prime example of a skill that many assume shouldn't need to be taught." Often times, so many teachers believe that students already know how to "listen", which is a common misconception.

My school does not explicitly teach our students how to be good listeners. However, I think active listening is a critical component for all students to be successful. There has been much recent discussion lately about how we can get our students to pay attention more in class and to become more engaged. This article has inspired me to start a discussion with my K-5 team on how we can better prepare our students to become active listeners.

By better preparing our students to become active listeners, student learning will increase and allow our students to use their attentive and listening skills to perform better in school. This will have a positive effect throughout their educational experience that will lead them down to the road of success.

Sincerely,
MD

Donna, I like the simple and

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Donna,
I like the simple and explicit approach to the skill of listening. Is the HEAR method proprietary? I am delivering many trainings in the near future and was wondering if I could use this as an example.

Executive Director, Founder of Arts & Learning Conservatory

Social interaction is very

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Social interaction is very essential to healthy brain development in your child’s learning. Interactions with caring adults make a sense of security and safety that prepares your child to deal with stress in life.
http://www.artsandlearning.org/

Educational Psychologist, Former Teacher, Teacher Educator, and Author

Susan, I agree that listening

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Susan, I agree that listening can and, in fact, for many must be taught explicitly if students are expected to use the skill. Thank you for the connection to your teaching and book for middle schoolers. Specifically, I appreciate the compelling way you have written directly to the middle school mind and the nice organization of your book. We have recommended it.

Author, The Middle School Student's Guide to Ruling the World!

Thank you for acknowledging

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Thank you for acknowledging that listening is a skill that can be taught. I teach/write study skills (The Middle School Student's Guide to Study Skills) and teach students that hearing and listening are not the same things. An active listener must monitor the quality of their listening. It helps them concentrate on the message, increase awareness of something they didn't understand (which can become a gap in knowledge), and correct external factors interfering with their ability to listen.

Educational Psychologist, Former Teacher, Teacher Educator, and Author

Tammy, thanks and yes we also

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Tammy, thanks and yes we also think HEAR is useful across many contexts besides education. This is one of many strategies we created many years ago while working with students. HEAR has been used over the past 15 years in our workshops and classes with over 100,000 educators. So, it comes to you tried and true!

Parent of college-age student

I can think of so many

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I can think of so many instances in which the H-E-A-R acronym would be useful, not only in the classroom but in everyday life. Thank you for such a well-done article!

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