Comments (14)

Comment RSS

Has anyone here heard of the

Was this helpful?
0

Has anyone here heard of the Public Charter Schools "Options For Youth" or "Opportunities For Learning" or "Pathways In Educatation"? They are located in California and the greater Chicago areas, and are schools that target at-risk students. The schools are set up so that students take most of their work home, but come to meet with teachers to go over work not understood. They get one-on-one time with the students, and form bonds and relationships with adults. Some of these students have no one else to turn it, and that creates an environment for success. After speaking to numerous students who attended the program, it is clear that he bottom line is that once students feel like someone believes in them, they will strive hard to success. It's amazing what a lending ear can do.

4th grade teacher from Philadelphia

I feel another concern that I

Was this helpful?
0

I feel another concern that I have about teaching in an Urban setting is the movement of teachers. I have been teaching for 5 years and have been in 3 different schools, with 4 different principals. The lack of consistency for me has made it difficult to find a "home" and really dig into the needs of my students.

Social and Emotional Learning Teacher and Instructional Coach, Austin Tx

I agree that we need to both

Was this helpful?
0

I agree that we need to both demonstrate caring and ensure rigor. I do not believe that providing opportunities to complete late work interferes with rigor in fact I believe it enhances it. Students can not opt out of work and still must complete all assignments. Teachers can still teach academic responsibility by giving lower grades for late work and having discussions with students who have a pattern of late work.

I have an issue with the policy of giving a zero and no chance to complete the work for any credit. I believe students should be encouraged complete all work and always be able to get at least some credit.

There is so much truth in

Was this helpful?
0

There is so much truth in this article and the various comments. Two observations: 1) while caring is important to ALL students so should they accept responsibility for learning. If the assignments are late, and there are no "consequences" for those choices made by the student, regardless of the reason (choosing to play video games or working or no electricity) it is still the student's responsibility to complete the work. HOW do we as educators resolve this issue? Setting students up to fail is definitely not a solution but giving them a pass is not either. 2) if the students in our Schools of Education are products of inferior K-12 programs themselves and are not "ready" to enter a program of teacher preparation, then they too must accept the responsibility as a student to get up to speed. Universities are businesses and they need tuition $ to operate. If we insist on higher levels for those entering our Schools of Education for all future teachers, we can begin to have highly qualified teachers in all classrooms. However, people respond to incentives and if the environment in which a person chooses or is able to find a job is more challenging than in other districts, what is the incentive? Of course, some feel the "calling" and that is wonderful. But how do we motivate those who do not feel the "calling" to desire to be placed in schools where so much energy is required to get the students to want to learn every hour of every day before the teacher can attend to the lesson? These are the pressing questions we in education must resolve in order to successfully help all of our students find the path to success.

You are so right!!

Was this helpful?
0

You are so right!!

I completely agree with you

Was this helpful?
0

I completely agree with you about teachers being placed in Urban environments without the proper background knowledge. I really believe that Education departments should come up with some kind of way to allow future teachers to be able to get more hands on interactions with students from Urban areas so when they are placed in that kind of environment they will know how to allow the students to reach their full potential.

Executive Director, Sound Discipline

Was this helpful?
+1

I do a lot of professional development and the feedback I get from teachers has been that in addition an intentional, structured SEL program (and caring), having some understanding of the impact of trauma on the brain and tools to support those students (without taking away from others) has been transformational. The data suggests that with insecure attachment and an exposure to trauma (ACE score of 4 or more) students are 32X less likely to succeed.... And we can do something about it and empower those students to succeed over time.

Education Specialist

non-imposing manner

Was this helpful?
0

Consider taking the next step beyond "non-imposing", believe that all human beings are born with an insatiable appetite for learning (the age old joke is they want to learn, but not what the teacher wants them to learn) and therefore all activities need to be presented as non-compulsory. For an interesting read, check out the United Nations Rights of Children document.

Educator, Composer, Writer, husband, parent

Often times kids need to see

Was this helpful?
0

Often times kids need to see what’s out there. It has to be presented in a way that is not making them “choose a career.” For many reasons those words are not uttered. Whether it’s video games, films, music, recording, art, acting: all of these industries need to be presented to the student in a non-imposing manner.

Hi Elizabeth! I sympathize

Was this helpful?
0

Hi Elizabeth!
I sympathize with your frustrations and agree that change may be in order to ensure that educators are as prepared as possible for what they will encounter once they enter their own classroom.
I can tell you though that you do not have to travel to a labeled "urban" school to have these experiences. Sadly, I could picture a large majority of my students when reading this blog. I do have students that are not examples of these struggles, but the bulk of my students are struggling with many of the issues exampled. I have found the best way (not the perfect way) to handle this situation is to establish a level of trust with these students (I could completely relate to the testing mentioned in the original post) and prove to them you are not giving up on them and that you will hold them to very high expectations. Once they realize that you think that are important enough to actually teach (not just control and manage), it is amazing the things they will do. It is not without fail, I shed tears at home over days where it appeared that all we had gained was lost in one bad day, but then something would happen to encourage me again.
Hang in there! Just acknowledging the struggles that you will face and being prepared to confront them puts you a step in the right direction! I can also tell that you care and are passionate about being an effective teacher from your post so your students will be privileged to have someone like you as their teacher!

see more see less