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I learned this beyond scope

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I learned this beyond scope of my first year and I am still in the process of applying it. Before you proceed with great instruction, technology, pbl, flipped classrooms, etc, get to know your students. Make it a priority to learn their names, smile, be honest, treat them as with respect and as people. Praise their character, not their accomplishment, listen, make them feel important, be real/genuine. Invest in them and their success. I believe that if you build a trust and positive rapport, the rest will follow.

9th Grade Special Ed

advice

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I'm new to the job and definitely learning as I go. Overall, my lessons grow upon each other and my students are making progress. I have two ADHD students with trouble not talking and doing the work. Both students are low level writers and both told their parents that told admin that they feel disrespected/ganged up on in class. I would never want to make a student feel like that. At first, I thought the students were just upset because I'm one of the few special ed teachers that gives homework. It took some reflection for me to realize that I was not differentiating the curriculum for them and giving them the support to feel safe in the class. Somedays they really can't write, it is staying in their seat that is their goal. I messed up and on Monday I will talk with both students and apologize. What I struggle with is the guilt/taking criticism personally. I internalize all of the feedback that I get, good or bad. It is difficult enough to set up a classroom, navigate school politics, and teach. I feel like I've failed. I have had two students with IEPs get their parents involved because they don't feel supported, and to me, that is two too many. I know I focus on the bad versus the students I have helped and supported. I just don't know if I'm cut out for teaching. How many first year high school teachers don't support two students emotionally to the point of parent complaint? All the amazing curriculum means nothing to me if I have two kids who are feeling mistreated in what should be their safe zone. Am I taking this too personally, and should just live and learn? This first year has been difficult. I have had child abuse to call in, students who are third grade readers in high school, parents that never answer their phone, truant students, kids with anxiety and depression, and all that while case managing 20 kids and writing curriculum. Help! Advice/support needed. I think the best way to learn is through experience and others, I just forgot that experience can be challenging to your emotions.

Preschool teacher in the midwest

What Really Matters My first

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What Really Matters

My first year of teaching brought so many struggles that I suffered severe burnout and considered leaving the profession. In retrospect, one thing that I wish I had known and understood is that everything else will come with time, but I needed to focus on what I knew how to do and that is teach children.

I spent a great deal of time overwhelmed with paperwork and assessments and all sorts of other requirements at the expense of focus on my students. In retrospect, I should have put my effort into doing what I knew how to do and learned the rest as I went. I often felt like a failure because I was not an expert at the paperwork or procedures. If I had focused on my strengths in teaching I think the year would have been much more beneficial for my students and for me.

K-8 Music Teacher, Band & Choir Director

This is my first year of

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This is my first year of teaching music full time. Last year I worked part time so I still consider myself to be in my first year of teaching. I believe that all responses as far as what goes on in the classroom and how to motivate are valid. While reading the responses from experienced teachers #2 resonated with me. I am currently facing the challenge of controlling my seventh grade class and motivating them. They constantly talk and regardless of what I say, they continue to do so. I am learning that to guide my students with the hope for change I must start with myself. I must reflect on my behavior and make sure I am modeling and demonstrating what I expect from them. I'm slowly learning that I cannot control everything and am beginning to focus on what I can control. I am seeking advice to attain a more solid classroom management plan and I've been told it becomes easier with experience. Thank you for the post!

Tips

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1) Share your life story in the first lesson through PowerPoint or YouTube video. I shared photos from when I was baby to something I did in the weekend. This will instantly engage the students and start the process of relationship building. You have to let students know that you have a life outside of the school.

2) Classroom Management. Co-construct a classroom management policy with the students. Ask students what should be the policy in the classroom.

3) Don't let students have power over you. Effective Discipline. Be mean every now and again, and give students a wake up call. Some will take you for a ride, because they don't know how lucky they are to be blessed with education.

4) Relationships. Build positive relationships with all your students, and find the positives in the negative students. Be honest at all times.

5) Know your content. Be the expert. You will get students who ask you more, like "Sir - how do I start my own business?"

6) Differentiate your classroom. You need to perfect differentiation.

7) Individual, Pair and Group Work. I start with a pair activity, and then they go into groups. Individiual is more of summative assessments.

8) Be actively involved in your school. Be friendly with everyone in the school network.

9) Make best friends with the senior management team, and especially the photocopy lady / guy.

10) Have fun. I love teaching. Enjoy what you do, and the students will respond.

11) Be patient. Good relationships, and student success take time. It's worth it.

http://tinascraft.com/en/home

http://tinascraft.com/en/home

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Amazing article.....

Teacher, Writer, and Artist

BUT DON'T CROAK TOO SOON

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Being fascinated helps, too. If you’re a teacher and you’re genuinely fascinated with children, teenagers, and young people and what they say and do and how they interact with you and each other, then you’ll always have fun at work, every day. This is why some people teach until they croak and why most policemen police for a long time, too.

Teacher, Writer, and Artist

IN THE ARMS OF MORPHUS OR MORPHEUS OR WHOEVER

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I taught a workshop one time at a statewide conference of teachers on how to be a successful teacher your rookie year and I told them that you don’t really have to love kids to be a great teacher … you just have to understand them. All the teachers in the room agreed with me.

That was a real nice moment. I couldn’t believe I had actually hit on some remarkable, agreed-upon truth in a profession I was real green at. One woman was asleep, so I’ll never really know if she agreed or not.

www.adixiediary.com

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