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K teacher from Alaska

Bullying is a more common

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Bullying is a more common problem then people realize. I have found often as a teacher the student who is getting bullied does not come forward and as a teacher I have to be more vigilant in my classroom. Coming forward is often the hardest thing to do for a student being bullied. However being proactive and working with students on Social Emotional Learning makes a big difference. Especially with the younger students. They need the security of safety and I always emphasize that my classroom is safe. My job is not just to help them learn, but to keep them safe inside and out, their job is to keep their classmates safe. Its amazing what a sense of responsibility can do for kids. They take very seriously their job of helping others to be happy and not hurting.

Junior Level Mechanical Engineering

Thanks for taking on this subject.

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Bullying can be a really sticky situation to deal with in class. I just took an interesting webinar by WEPAN on implicit bias. Project Implicit (https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/) is a Harvard-based research effort studying implicit bias. Having the class take their demonstration bias assessment on the web would create an opportunity to engage students about how bullying, disrespect, and other negative behaviors foster implicit bias and create pejorative environments in school. Making implicit biases explicit is one way deal with bias. I applaud you for trying to do something about bully while the rest of us just talk. The WEPAN website http://www.wepanknowledgecenter.org/home has many other good references in its knowledge center that might be helpful.

Literacy, ESL Teacher and Creator of MakeBeliefsComix.com

Graphic Writing Prompts About Bullying, Peer Pressure

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MakeBeliefsComix.com offers some graphic writing prompts about bullying and peer pressure that can be very useful in the classroom to help students express their thoughts and feelings about these subjects. They're free and at: http://www.makebeliefscomix.com/Printables_Categories/PrintablesThumbs.p...
If you try them with your students, please give me some feedback on students' responses.
Sincerely,
Bill Zimmerman
Creator, MakeBeliefsComix.com and www.billztreasurechest.com

President, Bullying.org

Helpful Anti-bullying Educational Resources

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Thank you for your post.

As a parent, educator, anti-bullying activist and the person who first coined the term "cyberbullying", I would like to share four Websites I have created that seek to prevent bullying through education and awareness. I hope that they may be of help, information and support to others.

http://www.bullying.org
The world's most visited and referenced Website about bullying

http://www.cyberbullying.org
The world's first Website about cyberbullying

http://bullyingcourse.com
Offering Professional research-based, online courses and Webinars about bullying and cyberbullying for educators and parents

http://www.bullyingawarenessweek.org
The official Website of the annual Bullying Awareness Week

I hope that these educational resources may prove helpful to you and your learning community.

Sincerely,

Bill Belsey

President,
Bullying.org
"Where you are NOT alone!"

e-mail: help@bullying.org

Follow us on Twitter: @Bullying_org

We can STOP bullying!

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As a guidance counselor I’m troubled by the increase in bullying I’ve seen in my school. The principal, teachers, and I continue to fight against it, but it’s difficult to reach out to all the students with only our words. But I found the answer to my problem when I saw “Bully” this past weekend. I’ve finally found a way to reach out to my students in a way they can all understand. That is the power of this movie! Bullying must end immediately and with the help of the “Bully” movie we can move forward.

Title 1 teacher from Ohio

Awareness

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I believe being aware of what is going on outside my classroom is a key to preventing bullying. Teachers need to be present on playgrounds during recess and in halls and outside school doors before and after school. My elementary school relieved classroom teachers of all duties and assigned those duties to PE, art, music, and special ed teachers. The classroom teachers do not experience what is going on outside of their classrooms and miss the opportunities to teach tolerance skills.

Parent of 1child

Hi, no one has the right to

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Hi,
no one has the right to buly other , on the other side the victim should
not sensitive he/she should be strong enough to face this world,
Thanks

Bullying is something that

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Bullying is something that happens in every school, in one form or another. Teacher and administration can only do so much, when it is reported or seen. A lot of the times bullying happens outside of the school setting and brought into the school environment. Teachers and administrators need outside help from parents and adults to help stop what is going on outside of the schools. Recently, the school that I work for, made it a catagory one offence, meaning that it was an automatic three days out of school suspension and an administrative hearing. The students now know that the school community is not tolerating this type of behavior. Letters have been sent home to inform parents and in the beginning of the year parents are asked to come to an open house seminar on bullying. By doing this, the bullying rate has dropped at the school, but it is still an issue there. With the csses that are reported, those students that are the bullyers, are dealt with quickly and prefessionally, with a zero tolerance approach. The part that I am concerned about is that, what are the numbers that are not reported.

Paraprofessional/Tutor

Invite the students to engage.

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Andrew, that's so awesome that your school is taking these steps! I can completely understand how frustrating that must be, though, to be getting that type of reaction from students. By no means do I think I have a be-all, end-all answer for you - especially since I came into my district in the middle of a district-wide anti-bullying campaign and really have no idea how they got the ball rolling - but I'm curious about the responses of the students. I wonder if they are seeing this program as being just another part of the curriculum that's being foisted on them, like it or not? If they're assigning about the same importance to it as they do on something that they "have" to learn, like math formulas or grammar, then I think it's understandable that they're less than enthusiastic about it. Would it be possible to invite the students to help - or even take charge of - planning an anti-bullying campaign or curriculum? Since bullying is a student-generated and -perpetuated problem, it might be helpful for them to work on their own solutions for solving it, and it will give them buy-in, a reason to be interested in and engaged with what they are learning. Ask them why they think bullying happens, and ask them what they think can be done to put a stop to it. I don't think you can expect miracles right away, but I think if you can keep the door open to student insight and input, you may start to get some good things going after a little while.

Paraprofessional/Tutor

Work with the girls?

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Mr. A, have you thought about or had the opportunity to sit down with these girls (either individually or as a group, or both) and find out why they're behaving the way they are? Perhaps they don't realize that their behavior is so antagonistic - some kids who bully do it because they think it's funny and think that the victim thinks it's funny, too. Maybe they honestly don't realize how hurtful their comments and actions are to others. Or maybe something else is going on with them that feeds that need to harass others. Either way, I can't think that it would hurt to sit them down in a calm moment and ask them about what's going on (with no judgment and no threat of punishment). I do that with a lot of the kids with whom I work, and it's amazing how quickly you can build rapport and trust with kids who see you as an empathetic ally who wants to help them solve these kinds of problems - and how easily that relationship becomes a bridge to keeping track of what's going down both in and out of the classroom. You might also check out Ross Greene's thought-provoking book, "Lost at School," for ideas on sparking that productive conversation with these girls.

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