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This was a great article.

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This was a great article. The incident at Sandy Creek was horrible and it will go down in history as a moment that made everyone with a heart stop what they were doing and pray for the families who lost their precious loved one. As a parent and educator I think more police presence in school is definitely needed. For some students school is a safe haven for them. There are some who get bullied to no end but for the most part school is where you can learn, eat, and have fun. Police presence can be very positive. They can show students what to do in case of an emergency. Students trust police officers so they will be more apt to listen to what they have to say. There are no Utopian societies. We have to teach our children how to survive just in case there's no one around to protect them. My heart and prayers go out to every family at Sandy Creek. As a nation and community we have to do something to prevent this from happening again.

What makes a school a safe sanctuary?

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I was inspired by Maurice's blog to consider what makes a school emotionally safe for kids. For some kids, school may be the only sanctuary that is safe from parents' physical or emotional abuse, from domestic violence, from neighborhood violence . . . and from the feelings of anger, shame and fear that accompany all that. A trend that worries me is well-intended intrusion by educators into the personal lives of children, inadvertently turning private pain into a public knowledge, under the guise of 360 group assessment of school difficulties. Let's keep schools physically safe for sure, but let's keep them emotionally safe as well, not only through promoting a positive school climate, but also by recognizing and respecting the role of schools as emotional sanctuary for many children.

Speaking as someone who is

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Speaking as someone who is studying to be a teacher the prospect of doing so becomes more terrifying every time I turn on the news. In your section that talks about helping students understand more police presence I found myself being more reassured than I expected. I appreciate your post, although the idea of working in high schools where the pervasiveness of bullying and violence can be so all-encompassing, I find myself determined and deterred in equal measure.

Educational Consultant/Author, Southern California

In our state, most secondary

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In our state, most secondary schools are accustomed to police presence (at the very least the District type.) The elementary level students would need clear explanations at to the need for police. Our kids are not sheltered. They are aware of threats to their security. Technology (television included) has robbed them of childhood's peace and optimism. Kids need to know they are safe (the very basis of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs) but kids frequently are not safe at home, in the neighborhood or at school. More counseling and positive interventions should accompany the police presence. More playing to the positive aspects of their lives to encourage positive behavior, security and confidence in the future. Kids don't need to anticipate dystopia.

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Maurice Elias Professor, Rutgers University Psychology Department and Edutopia Blogger