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5th grade science, math, and social studies teacher from Hickory, MS

Wonderful article! The

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Wonderful article! The information given here supplies scientific evidence to something that teachers have long known. If children enjoy a subject and feel comfortable in their environment real learning can take place. When this happens, you can just 'see' their engagement in the lesson. They lean forward and follow you with their eyes. You just know their 'front brain is involved. If a student is mad at you, frustrated, or bored, they lean back and look elsewhere. If any brain activity is going on, you can tell it is on the 'back burner'. Thank you so much for giving me another reason to go the extra mile and engage that more permanent front brain.

Brain lesson

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I love this brain lesson on the first day. I will definitely be brushing up on my information so I can do something like this with my students! Thanks!

This is definitely needed!

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I agree that learning about the brain is needed in teacher prep classes, and even in professional development for classroom teachers. Most teachers teach students hoping that they are perfect, not realizing that the lessons may be affecting the way children act and receive information. I am a teacher who uses whole-brain teaching in my classroom, and I still feel uneasy explaining the strategy to my colleagues since I do not exactly know how certain things affect the brain. I will definitely begin to look into more brain based articles to strengthen my knowledge about the brain!

First year teacher attaining my masters degree

While in my undergrad

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While in my undergrad classes, one of our required couses was titled "Brain Based Learning." It was probabaly my fovorite class I took as an undergraduate. I comepletely agree that teachers should be aware of how the brain works if they are to be entrusted to instill knowldge into students brains. Knowing how the brain works will give teachers an advantage to ensure that the knowldge they deliver to their students will be remembered and useful, and not just forgotten once the bell rings for lunch time.

EFL & ESOL Teacher

Your blog brings to my mind

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Your blog brings to my mind the number of times I have seen the advertisements for a Master of Neuroscience in Education in many teachers' magazines. It isn't just a fascinating topic to read about, but a relevant area to consider seriously if we want to improve our practice and reach all the different learners we have in our classroom. I've had some close experience with area because of a professional development I had some years ago in my school back then, in my country of origin. It was by a founder of a very important and successful school. He started a school, with a new pedagogy in mind, around 20 years ago. He began working with high IQ students and later on, opened the doors to any student and parent interested in the system, as a proof that their new, alternative pedagogy works. The school has strong methodologies to favor thinking skills, autonomy, creativity and love for learning. Teachers work beyond the cognitive area. During the professional development, I noticed how much he knew about how children learn, the process in the brain, its relation to student's age, and how much a teacher can offer the student, through his/her practice, to bring the best of the student potential. For many years, that school has been in the highest rank of my country. The school is placed according to scores students get in the national achievement test they take in the last year of high school. Just with the aspects adopted in my school, I was able to see meaningful changes besides students’ performance and learning. Teachers were more innovative, creative and critical about their planning, their instruction and assessment. Class books were used more like another learning tool, than a script. I hope the school district I'm at now offers a professional development in neuroscience, or one that emphasizes in how children learn, and how we can bring and integrate that knowledge to our practice. It's a way of reaching all students and favoring their learning. It would be a way to close the achievement gap that is a huge concern for many of us.

1st grade teacher in Georgia

What about early childhood

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What about early childhood teachers? Do you still explain the workings of the brain to them? How do you apply this science to small children?

I have seen this done!

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My first year teaching I asked a coworker what she was planning to do with her students on the first day of school because I saw her drawing a picture of the brain on her board. I remember how surprised I was when she told me that she was going to teach her students a lesson about the brain and how they learn on the first day of school! I was so surprised that I asked if I could observe her lesson during my planning period. The lesson was fantastic and the students were engaged and empowered. During the rest of the year, her students could be heard discussing different ways they learn and using what they learned during that lesson to help each other. It was definitely a lesson I have adjusted to use during the first week in my classroom as well. I highly recommed it!

Teacher, Writer, and Artist

ASK THEM HOW THEY LEARN BEST ... IF YOU DARE

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On the first day of school this past year I asked my students how they learn the best and what they’re good at and that I would incorporate their needs in class every day. It was a question more for me, I said, but would eventually be good for you, too. You know, once we get to work.

A few of them huffed and dropped their heads on their desks. That’s the power of the phrase … get to work.

I had a yellow legal pad out and a pen ready to write. One of the nicest things you can do for someone is to shut up and listen to them … and even write down what they say while they’re watching you.

They were watching. I got the impression no one had ever asked them those questions.

Lazlo said he loves vampires. Nesbit said he’s good at sleeping late. Brainerd said he wanted me to quit talking so fast.

I made the time-out sign with my hands and said … Oh-kay. Why don’t we start all over again.

www.adixiediary.com

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