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Reading Facillitator from Trinidad West Indies

I agree that they should know

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I agree that they should know because it makes you so much more aware of what is going on with your student,even teaching the student about their brain encourages them to protect their brain.Superb article.

I think the challenge will be

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I think the challenge will be to take the discoveries being made in neuroscience research labs and construct bridges into classrooms. Modern pedagogy has been built on psychology, which is complex enough--now, through science, we can expand our knowledge of learning to include the physiological. One fascinating study by Alison Preston, PhD, (The University of Texas at Austin) is on what teachers call “prior knowledge.” Dr. Preston writes, “At this point, we have several studies that focus on the fact that our ability to learn new things is profoundly interested in what we already know.” However, in general, we are still a long way from clinical validation in school settings. Skillfully designed technology, including eLearning. may very well be the platform that will allow the integration of neuroscience into teaching methodology.

Project Manager, Innovative Learning Stratagems, Inc.

Brain-Based Learning in the Classroom Works

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As a parent, classroom teacher K-12, Learning Disability Specialist, Educational Technologist, and researcher/practitioner with 30-years of published applied accelerated learning practice, this article reinforces the importance of brain research interfacing with the every-day classroom.

My work engages choral speaking, rhythm, and puppetry to improve cognitive skills, but more specifically, the ability to create the whole-brain learner with how to conceptualize and process new, incoming information. The training creates focus, attention,and retention. Perceptual changes are evident after 24 hours of intensive training. My published research is available on my website www.memspan.com/publications.html, and ERIC Clearing House.

The brain changes became immediately evident with puppetry instructional methodology - pub article - http://www.memspan.com/handwritingku.pdf

A summary of the research in school and private classrooms - The International Alliance for Learning (IAL) in June 2001 recognized this research as landmark Brain-Based Learning: http://www.memspan.com/abstract7.pdf This research is the tip of the future iceberg for instruction and learning.

I offer parent information through the nonprofit Innovative Learning Stratagems, Inc. website, www.StrategyTech.com, and develop educational, brain-based learning content through Mem-ExSpan, Inc. www.memspan.com.

Thanks for posting this important article!

Collaboration Between Scientists and Practitioners is Crucial

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(The following is from Christina Hinton and Kurt W. Fischer, authors of "Mind, Brain, and Education," part of the Students at the Center series. www.studentsatthecenter.org)

Judy Willis makes the case that, " future developments in neuroscience, with the most extensive and useful classroom applications, will likely arise from input that educators provide to scientists." We could not agree more. Collaboration between scientists and practitioners is crucial for progress in the field of mind, brain, and education.

In medicine, researchers refine newly developed medications and procedures through hospital testing. In agriculture, researchers improve new seeds, equipment, and farming methods through field tests. In field after field, practical results inform research-based developments. In education, however, sustained collaboration involving reciprocal interactions between researchers and practitioners has been difficult. Education lacks a fundamental infrastructure for connecting the work of researchers and practitioners.

The need for this kind of structure grows as research from biology and cognitive science becomes ever more relevant to education. Teachers often lack the background knowledge needed to interpret scientific results, and scientists often lack an understanding of pedagogical goals.

These new challenges augment the need to build an infrastructure that supports sustainable collaboration between researchers and teachers. We suggest that research schools can provide that infrastructure. In research schools, researchers and teachers work together to carry out research that is relevant to practice, and education needs a strong infrastructure for grounding practice and policy in research as findings in cognitive science and biology become increasingly relevant to education. Research schools can be living laboratories for field-testing new techniques, training teachers and researchers, and promoting dialogue between researchers and practitioners. They can lay a fundamental infrastructure for connecting research on learning and educational practice and policy.

Research schools would improve pedagogy by grounding research in practice and vice versa. In this dynamic interaction, research informs practice, and results from classrooms and other learning settings shape research directions, while data on learning supply invaluable information for fine-tuning theoretical models. To offer just one example, classroom results have revealed that phonologically based interventions are effective for some children with dyslexia but not for others. This result guided neuroscientists toward a more sophisticated and differentiated understanding of dyslexia.

3rd Grade Teacher and Founder of Luria Learning

This last year I learned a

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This last year I learned a new technique based on brain research that really helped me keep students from zoning out. It's called mirroring. By having the students mirror the motions you are doing with your hands, you are activating their motor cortex and keeping them very engaged. The students love this! Here is what I found from using this in my classroom: http://luria-learning.blogspot.com/2012/04/engaging-your-daydreamers.html

Sacha

Math Specialist

New to Blog

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I am new to Blog Discussions but I am going to give it a try. I have always been interested in how the brain works and how it affects the way we learn. I have only been to one training that discussed how this topic relates to learning. However after that one training, I did change several ways I taught but I want to learn so much more.

First grade teacher, Maryland

Wholeheartedly agree!!

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Thank you for an insightful article about how important it is for teachers to gain a better understanding of the brain! Considering that as teachers, we are charged with filling this organ with knowledge, it just makes sense that we should understand how best to do that. I am sure that slowly research findings will be added to good teaching practices, but there is so much information out there that we could be putting to use now!

Hello, I am the sole teacher

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Hello, I am the sole teacher of a small one-room school room school for kids who are falling through the cracks in a small Missouri town. Just one hour after reading this blog, I interviewed a young boy, who fit right into what you were speaking of. I have had quite a bit of training through this when we were foster parents and dealing with many issues. I whole heartily agree that teachers should have a course about the brain. Having adopted two autistic children, we went through every training available to look for antecedents for their behaviors. I have taken all this training and implemented it into the classroom which has given positive results. Thank you so much for this article. I enjoyed it thoroughly.

5th grade science, math, and social studies teacher from Hickory, MS

Susanne, I am new to this

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Susanne, I am new to this blog and learning the ropes. I responded to your question with some suggestions that I hope you will find meaningful. However, it posted to the top of the blog page. Sorry, :)

5th grade science, math, and social studies teacher from Hickory, MS

Perhaps you could talk about

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Perhaps you could talk about the brain on a very basic level. Your upper elem. grades may have a model. Discuss and touch the front part of the brain and tell them that this is where the 'good learning' takes place. Talk about how important it is to pay attention with their eyes by looking at you, pay attention with their bodies by turning their bodies to follow you when you move around the room. When the children are totally engaged in a particular activity, tell them there is a lot of front brain learning going on and praise them for it. When they are disengaged and not paying attention, tell them...Uh, oh! I see a lot of back brain learning going on. By the end of the year, they will know exactly what you mean by front brain and back brain learning!

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