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This was a great article! I

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This was a great article! I too believe that in order for students to make those real-world connections that stakeholders desire, assessments should be a little more meaningful for and to the students so that they can actually "visualize" what is being asked.

I enjoyed this article

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I enjoyed this article because our district has transitioned to the Common Core standards. Thinking about the 4 C's is important when developing an assessment. I found the 8 steps helpful to think about when making the assessments. I agree that assessments have to be meaningful and it helps if you can relate it to real world situations. This can be difficult and time consuming, but I think that it would give you a better idea of what the students really know.

Kindergarten teacher from Minnesota

I think it is easy to say

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I think it is easy to say what assessments should do, but it is more difficult to actually apply it to your own assessments that you give to students. It is also difficult to get other educators on board to believe in more meaningful assessments. I really like the 8 questions that you ask yourself before giving out an assessment. I think these really would help to be sure the assessments are meaningful for learners. I also believe that it is important to address the 4 C’s in order to keep students engaged.

Center Based DCD teacher

Suggestions on How to Make This More Relevant to SPED?

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The article was informative and full of good ideas. I especially like the rubrics included in the article for reference. I teach in a center based special education classroom and would appreciate ideas on how to integrate some of the suggestions noted with students who are unable to write and possibly unable to speak. Thanks!

Eric Primus response

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Very nice blog, I really liked how you talked about making everyday meaningful for students. I think as educators sometimes it is hard for us to always make it meaningful. The four C's is a great aid. Creativity, Collaboration, Critical Thinking, and Communication. Your right todays students are savvy, but teh more I work with them, the more I see that they need guidence in order to get something out of assessment. I think using the four C's will enable me to teach my students to see the benefits that assessment can bring. Also nice job with the rubric. My students do so much better when they have a rubric to follow.

K-5 Visual Art Teacher

Assessing in art

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This article has great idea about how to create meaning when assessing my art students. I like how the article talks about test format and aligning the format with real-world skills. If my students learn skills in art class and they can use these skills in their everyday life then I feel that my students are successing. So testing on these skills in important to me. The article also talks about using project-based learning and topics that interest students as a couple of way of creating successful students while testing. I would agree with this. I find that if my students like the subject they are learning about, then they seem to excel in the artwork. When working over my next test with my students I am going to make sure that I include the 4 C's in my assessment.

High School English Teacher

I really like your 8 criteria

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I really like your 8 criteria for meaningful classroom assessment and the reminder of the Common Core’s emphasis on the 4Cs (Creativity, Critical Thinking, Collaboration, and Communication).

In particular your note about transparency and explaining to students why an assessment has value is a great idea. I know that I don’t often talk to my students about why they are doing a project or assessment despite having good reasons myself. Do you have any tips for how to approach these conversations with students (so they don’t sound too preachy or authoritarian)?

Your suggestion about including space on a rubric also makes good sense to me. It helps students reflect on their knowledge, provides feedback so student feel more involved, and engages their critical thinking skills to analyze what they’ve done (more learning!). Instead of the circling 4, 3, 2, 1 method here on the rubric, do you think simply providing a blank space to write their comments would engage students more or provide more authentic feedback?

I guess I am saying that I

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I guess I am saying that I don't believe that on a frequent or consistent basis are professionals assessed via a test of some sort, so I don't believe that this is necessarily the most effective way to assess our students. I believe some times that tests are the most efficient way to assess certain skills or knowledge, but not the sole or best ways.
And yes, I have heard of the military and police forces using tests, but again because someone passes a test does not nor should it automatically qualify them for a position. There should be more diverse and applied assessments in my opinion.
Furthermore, I do believe in grades and holding students acvountable, but in a fair, productive, engaging way.

Life Skills Support Teacher

Quote: I also wonder where

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Quote:

I also wonder where in the "real world" we actually take tests to demonstrate our proficiency or effectiveness.

Ever hear of U.S. Civil Service exams?

The branches of the U.S. military utilize all types of tests, paper/pencil or otherwise, to qualify for jobs or assignments.

Police academies requires paper/pencil exams along with other skill tests to graduate.

Quote:

Also, if we are trying to make assessments more meaningful for students, shouldn't they be more realistic and engaging than tests?

Or you can do what a lot of teachers are doing already, is dispensing with tests, grades, etc. and simply passing underperforming students onto the next grade so they can be someone else's problem.

But I'm among the few who will cite this as a major reason why schools fail. It's not about tests that fail, it's about TEACHERS that fail.

Are traditional "tests" then

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Are traditional "tests" then considered to meet these criteria? I am learning about designing good summative assessments, and as a language arts teacher, I feel like many times tests aren't the most accurate way to gauge student success or proficiency in a certain skill. I also wonder where in the "real world" we actually take tests to demonstrate our proficiency or effectiveness. Also, if we are trying to make assessments more meaningful for students, shouldn't they be more realistic and engaging than tests?

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