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Life Skills Support Teacher

The late great Ray Bradbury

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The late great Ray Bradbury summed up my exact sentiments perfectly as far back as 1976. This is why he was a true visionary:

''...I'm not afraid of machines. I don't think the robots are taking over. I think the men who play with toys have taken over. And if we don't take the toys out of their hands, we're fools.'

I know, it's much easier to give in to the mob and let it control how you think and act. So you surrender to Madison Avenue or Silicon Valley or Obamacare... what's the difference? It's all harmful yet those in power need supplicants and so many Americans are willing to serve in that capacity.

Which role do you serve, Doug? Are you simply teaching kids how to read and write or are you just a tool for those hucksters pushing their gadgets on people?

Digital Literacy Advocate - Codecademy

Interesting responses!

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I don't know that starting with "rubbish" is the very best conversation startet, but to your point, I guess we differ. I absolutely agree that any parent can prevent their kid from using electronics. But unless you're content to living with the Amish, your kids will be living in a world infused with this stuff. Sorry, but it's everywhere! There are even TV ads on some school buses. Choosing to prepare them for survival in a digital landscape is not about surrendering to Obamacare or socialism; it's about raising literate people.

I totally get that parents can rigidly control their children. In a digital media environment, however, I don't know if keeping children away from everything digital is necessarily the best path to their future success - particularly teens or even college kids. But that's your decision. I thought I was coming off as overly guarded in this piece; it's interesting to see there are still parents who hope to shield their kids from all electronics, rather than guide their experiences of these powerful tools.

As for specific sources, the American Pediatric Association did some good work (or published the work of others) on the relationship of flat screen use to spatial development in kids. Judith Van Evra's book has some good studies. I'll look for some more, but you can get pretty far on Google scholar.

And yes Melanie, I think young needs have so much real world, 3D experience to get in those first few years that screens really should have a very limited role.

Life Skills Support Teacher

"These technologies may be

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"These technologies may be here to stay, they should help us all in the long run, and we have no choice but accept their omnipresence in our kids' world."

Rubbish. Only a weak-kneed post-mod influenced parent wouldn't have the courage to repeat one simple word ... NO ... to their kids, because they fear they would no longer be their kids' "pal."

The ability to no longer say "NO" has helped to create a monstrous generation of kids of the kind detailed in this following news article--

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2257715/Study-shows-college-stud...

The permissive theories espoused by many so-called "experts" in child behavior management are to blame.

Great post, thanks! Could you

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Great post, thanks! Could you list the sources you used to find your results: eg "high quantities of time spent sitting in front of 2D screens may actually inhibit some of their 3D spatial awareness," "these new principles are not neurologically compatible with a developing sensory system," etc.?

This is the exact type of research I'm interested in learning more about and it'd be great to know where you got your information.

Thanks!

Times are changing

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25 years ago we had a rotary phone, no internet, no cell phones, no microwave. What will we have 25 years from now?

What's absent from these discussions is family time. How much time do you spend with your children one on one? Talking with them, walking them them, and imaginative play.

These screens are "tools", plain and simple. If playtime is over, that means no checkers or Angry Birds. Why distinguish?

Want to learn more about Sparrows, or practice tracing famous drawings? There's an app for that... and that's education time: chalkboard, video screen, or remote teacher. This is blurring, quickly.

Educational Consultant/Author, Southern California

Learning with the little ones

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Age Appropriate. Thank you so much. Kids need a kids' world to grow up in; that means we need to supervise and direct (plus we can learn about some nature new to us, too.)

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