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Teacher and administrator

Invisible is better than a micromanager

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I do agree that an administrator should make an attempt to do a walk around and visit each classroom for a couple of minutes once a week. However some administrators micromanage everything including janitorial services in the school and it is those administrators that are dangerous and they are control freaks so to speak.

To lead people, walk beside them ...
As for the best leaders, the people do not notice their existence.
The next best, the people honor and praise.
The next, the people fear; and the next, the people hate ...
When the best leader's work is done the people say,
We did it ourselves!”

― Lao Tzu

This is an important post.

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This is an important post. Although administrators are extremely busy, it is important that they visit classrooms. Inviting your administrator to your class, especially when a great lesson is being delivered, is important as it builds the relationship between teacher and administrator.

Eighth Grade American History Teacher

This is a problem that seems

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This is a problem that seems to be a little more prevalent these days. While it is nice to have my space in my classroom and in my teaching, it is also reassuring to see the administration in the hallways as well as inside the classroom. It also doesn't help when the Invisible Administration is not around to deal with discipline issues when needed.

Do what you do best

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Administrators come and go. Rely on the professionals with whom you work every day. I'm beginning admin school in August and I'm saying this.

Educational Psychologist and Consultant at Lori Day Consulting

Sometimes it's something in between

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Wow. I've been on both sides of this. I think most often it is not that administrators are never around, but that teachers feel they are not around *enough.* Administrators often know this and feel the same way and, believe it or not, share the frustration. What used to happen to me was not that I "needed to administrate," but that I needed to put out fires. I'd have a plan to visit classrooms, and then an angry parent would be at my door, and before I knew it, half the day was gone. This is the part teachers don't see. It *is* all about communication...across the board. Often the goal is shared, but getting there takes work and patience on both ends.

Superintendant

The first instinct a person

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The first instinct a person has is to say that principals are too busy to spend their time in the hallways or the classrooms. They have important administrating to do and they need to be in the office to do it. I think every teacher recognizes the fact that principals need to administrate. Teachers are not demanding that admins spend all of their time in the hallway or watching teachers in their room. At JB High, we just wanted to know that he was there. A physical presence goes a long way with teachers. Knowing the admin is down the hall or visiting classes is a great feeling of support. The big question is: Why don't administrators know this?

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