Comments (8)

Comment RSS
Community Manager at Edutopia

This is an interesting

Was this helpful?
0

This is an interesting idea--a blend of creative and expository writing.

"Pretend you're an _______. Now argue for/against _______,"

Depending on how far out of the box you go, you can generate some really wild ideas. I like it.

So many disheartening things

Was this helpful?
0

So many disheartening things about the article and comments. First, Mr. Johnson apparently never read any of the students' writings. Why not? I do agree with the conclusion that reading is crucial, but I'm not sure the reading of more expository text is the answer. Yes, it always helps to see a model of the outcome, though this can sometimes be limiting in itself, but if I want my students to know how to use language, I want them to read widely and read often, and I want them to read the authors who use language best. I also want to provide them with meaningful writing opportunities and individual feedback. Standardized writing tests are not famous for either of these.

Administrator, author and educator

Expository = Explain

Was this helpful?
0

Mike and Jeff:

I look at expository writing as explaining. It could be what happened, what you believe, or what you want others to believe, but the most compelling expository writing also includes why it happened. In my opinion, narrative does not imply this sort of analysis like expository does. I agree with Mike, that expository can be to entertain and to convince, but I also need to agree with Jeff in that we need to careful about the words we use and clear about their meaning, especially if we are trying to get students to understand them and use them correctly.

Thanks for your comments,

Ben Johnson
San Antonio, Texas

Quote:

I believe there is narrative for the purpose to entertain and narrative to inform. Narrative expository, using narrative as an adjective, would be describing actual events, informing the reader of what took place. New articles are narrative expository pieces. Narrative in the form of a fiction novel would indeed not be expository. This is how i understand it to exist.

Administrator, author and educator

Prompts as Questions

Was this helpful?
0

Mindy:

Thank you for sharing your technique. Helping students to find the question in a prompt will help them be able to formulate an answer. The question may be stated outright, but the more interesting ones must be discovered. For example: Write about an embarrassing experience that you have had and how you dealt with it. What is the question in this prompt? Well, the focus is on the word embarrassing-- Some possible questions could be, what kinds of things embarrass me? How do you experience embarrassment? Dealing with embarrassment can have long lasting consequences, If I am still embarrassed did I really deal with it?
Thank you for your prompt/question. It got me thinking!

Ben Johnson
San Antonio, Texas

Quote:

I love the idea that reading will help students write--it sure will! However, mostly what I come across in the writing lab are students who do not understand what a thesis is or what it does. Thus, they don't respond to the prompt. They are disengaged before they even start, meandering about in disconnected, superfluous details/research.

Helping students understand that a writing prompt implies a question that must be answered seems to help. They are pre-wired to answer questions and seem to find more to say and more authentic stuff to say when presented with this strategy.

A thesis, I explain, is the "short answer". The essay is the "long answer."

: )

High school english teacher and blogger.

Expansion of Thinking

Was this helpful?
0

I love the idea that reading will help students write--it sure will! However, mostly what I come across in the writing lab are students who do not understand what a thesis is or what it does. Thus, they don't respond to the prompt. They are disengaged before they even start, meandering about in disconnected, superfluous details/research.

Helping students understand that a writing prompt implies a question that must be answered seems to help. They are pre-wired to answer questions and seem to find more to say and more authentic stuff to say when presented with this strategy.

A thesis, I explain, is the "short answer". The essay is the "long answer."

: )

Narrative Expository

Was this helpful?
0

I believe there is narrative for the purpose to entertain and narrative to inform. Narrative expository, using narrative as an adjective, would be describing actual events, informing the reader of what took place. New articles are narrative expository pieces. Narrative in the form of a fiction novel would indeed not be expository. This is how i understand it to exist.

Expository or Narrative?

Was this helpful?
0

Correct me if I am wrong, but the example prompt about an experience of a dog would be a narrative and not an expository text right? My understanding of expository writing is it explains how to, describes, or gives facts about an event in the manner you suggested. A narrative tells a story about an event. Some students would have taken this and ran and created an expository description, but others would probably have confused the "creativity" part of it and turned it into a story. I understand the line separating the two is blurry but I thought it was worth mentioning, as this is a common problem. I could be totally wrong though so if I am, someone please correct me.

I agree that we need to

Was this helpful?
0

I agree that we need to expose students to more expository writing in order for them to understand how to write in that format as well. We are all navigating the new STAAR expository writing...even at the 4th grade level!

see more see less