Comments (8)

Comment RSS

Thanks!

Was this helpful?
0

Thank you so much for this post! I am new to the flipped classroom idea and I am trying several aspects in my chemistry class this year. I am excited and nervous at the same time. Have you found that your students are excited to watch the videos or are they reluctant? Would you also have a certain video length that you would recommend?

Versatile tool

Was this helpful?
0

Thank you for the extra resources and ideas for how to use the flipped classroom. I especially liked the links on how to make videos more interactive. An important consideration so your video holds the attention of the viewer and is as effective as it can be.

Flipped Classrooms are a Go!!

Was this helpful?
+1

I agree with Musallam that good teaching comes in many forms, and the flipped classroom can be one of many solutions for educators. I loved Musallam's personal story and reflection on how teachers learn by doing. Wow that has been so evident with my W531 Technology course. I too agree that we must prepare students to understand they will change lives. How fun for them to take on the role of the teachers and be accountability for other learners. Students love to help others and what a great way to show others how to do something through a technology tool they both love; video production. I say yes, the more involved the less down time for trouble. JillR.

Chemistry teacher from San Francisco

I really like the "seven step

Was this helpful?
+1

I really like the "seven step process" suggested in your article (http://www.classroom-aid.com/blog/bid/65071/). I especially like pre-assessment to gauge and target video support. Thanks for the feedback/ideas!

It's not black and white

Was this helpful?
+1

Every teaching idea needs the good pedagogy and practices to make it meaningful.
So it's how you integrate/implement it.
Before videos are easily available, teachers could ask students to study textbooks, digest the content and take notes before classes, it's an old (low tech) way to do the similar idea, but it's still a good one. The key point is to train students independently study and have better preparation for the class. Videos can make the learning experience more thorough. But teachers will need extra time to prepare the videos or search resources. So what's the most important flipping should be ?
Yes, flipping your minds first... taking away the lecturers role of teachers, taking away the top-down style in learning ..... Ultimately, we saw flipping the class as a great opportunity to engage our students in taking more responsibility for their learning. Why not let your students curate the video lessons from existing content on the web? read more...
"Flip Your Minds before Flipping Your Classrooms"
http://www.classroom-aid.com/blog/bid/65071/

Chemistry teacher from San Francisco

Thank you very much for this

Was this helpful?
+1

Thank you very much for this comment. I think the key point is "some" skills, and I would add "some subjects" and "some students" as well. My goal was to articulate why, as you said, it is an addition for some teachers, and for many, a very powerful one. If you are interested, Troy Cockrum has an excellent analysis of how he is using it in his Language Arts classes: http://cogitationsofmrcockrum.blogspot.com/2011_10_01_archive.html
Access is also an issue. This year, I did the following to address it:
1) Asked upfront: "how many of you can access facebook on your phone or at home?
2) Given this, I gauged how many had interent access (I asked it this way because I assumed I would get a more meaningful answer rather than saying something nerdy like "How many of you could access an instructional video on You Tube?"
3) The students that didn't, I acquired some pretty bare bones laptops on ebay for my class (I needed 5 in total). Since I actually like it when students come in to watch the videos in close proximity to the time when we apply the knowledge, this works well. Just my process...

Teacher Leader for Technology, Oak Park, IL

In theory the flipped

Was this helpful?
0

In theory the flipped classroom is a great idea, but I'm a bit skeptical. As a language arts teacher who used to work extensively with English Language Learners, I would find it hard to believe that those particular students would have benefited from the flipped model. I think the videos could have worked for some skills, but much of my teaching depended on constant assessment and varied engagement strategies. Also, many of those students didn't have internet access at home. I think the flipped classroom can be added to a teacher's bag of tricks, but it can't become the only method of teaching. And as we read about how the flipped can be a successful addition to the classroom, we must remember that its just an addition and not a complete overhaul.

see more see less