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Flipped Classrooms and ISTE

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IMHO, the flipped classroom is an opportunity for teachers to choose the most appropriate means for students to learn and practice, and that came out in many of the best sessions at ISTE.

http://academicbiz.typepad.com/piloted/2012/06/summary-of-iste-2012.html

NBCT, science educator

Thanks for addressing this topic...

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Since flipping my course, has giving me more time to personalize education for my students. Like all instructional strategies, flipping is grounded in education philosophy. How effective the practice [flip or non flip] is dependent on how responsive we are to the needs of our students. As you stated in your blog, learning needs to remain the focus.

Principal

Thank you

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For writing a post that sees all sides to Flipping. I agree it does have some good attibutes and some pieces that will make it more difficult to implement.
I believe, not only with Flipping, that all teaching comes down to allowing students choice, connecting with them and the learning by making it relevant, and reflecting on what we are doing and how we are doing it and making the necessary changes to help all students be successful.

K-8 Technology Teacher in Philadelphia, PA

Brian

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I love that you bring up the flexible, personalized nature of flipping. Like anything we do in the classroom, there's not one right way to do it, but there are a number of ways it can be done wrong. Thanks for your insight. I'm sure others will find it helpful as well.

K-8 Technology Teacher in Philadelphia, PA

Jackie

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I love the work that you've been doing on the Flipped Classroom, Jackie! Once the post went live I immediately noticed that your work was missing from the list! I will try to add it. You have a lot of great ideas to share!

The Flipped Classroom: The Full Picture

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Thanks for your post, Marybeth. I agree with and want to respond to your comment "One can't help but imagine that what he is describing doesn't require video at all. What he describes is, in essence, what John Dewey described at the turn of the 20th century: learning that is centered around the student, not the teacher; learning that allows students to show their mastery of content they way they prefer. These are not new concepts. I am often brought back to the question: "Are we doing things differently or doing different things?""

The problem is that even many educators profess alliance to Dewey's ideas, too many, in my opinion, are not integrating a progressive pedagogy into their educational practices. They teach in a way that they were taught which is often didactic. So even though these ideas are not new concepts, as you state, they have not created a change in pedagogical practices.

I have been blogging about and presenting on The Flipped Classroom: The Full Picture (see http://usergeneratededucation.wordpress.com/tag/flipped-classroom/ for an aggregate of my blog posts). I am taking advantage of all the popularity surrounding the Flipped Classroom to propose a experiential cycle of learning. This model is one where video lectures and tutorials fall within a larger framework of learning activities. I am titling it the Flipped Classroom: The Full Picture to get folks’ attention given the Flipped Classroom popularity right now. It really is a cycle of learning, driven by student-centric and immersive experiences) where the video lectures support not drive the learning process.

In the larger picture, The Flipped Classroom offers a great use of technology - especially if it gets lecture out of the classrooms and into the hands and control of the learners (which, by the way, does NOT necessarily have to occur as homework), and gets more engaging, hands-on, interactive into the classroom.

High school science teacher in South Bend, IN.

More on Flipping...

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This is a great overview, Mary Beth. You're right...there are a ton of discussions happening and it can be very confusing if you're learning about flipped learning for the first time. A couple things I would like to add:

1. Flipping is personal for the teacher and the student. It should be grounded in the community and the learning culture. Things that worked last year might not work with my new students this fall. So, while I want to focus on incorporating personalized learning for my kids, the route I take from A to B will probably look different. It also looks different between teachers of the same class, which is why flipped learning is hard to discuss. Like you said, learning needs to be the focus, regardless of where this is happening.

2. Will and I have had some great conversations, and we have a similar vision for what the ultimate goal (in my opinion) of flipping should be. on how flipping should redesign the learning process, not just the delivery of the content.

3. I agree that . If you cannot support the learning process through flipping, please don't try it. Make sure the infrastructure is in place to support all students in all situations. Again, I agree, that video does not need to be incorporated into a "flipped" class. It is simply a tool that has worked for me (and others) in the past and is by no means a keystone in the ideas.

K-8 Technology Teacher in Philadelphia, PA

Thanks

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Thanks, Crissy, for sharing the My Big Campus resources.

K-8 Technology Teacher in Philadelphia, PA

@wmchamberlain

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I love the comparison to Google's 20% model. Really, flipping should be about making school more like real life. I also agree that Brian's take on the flipped model is one that I respect. Thanks!

Communities of teacher support

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I like this post--interesting perspective on flipped classrooms. We at Lightspeed Systems know numerous teachers that use My Big Campus to flip their classrooms effectively, and all have seen an increased level of engagement among their students. Here is one MBC bundle that educators are sharing with each other: http://mbcurl.me/APG. Many more exist but this is just one example.

Ultimately, teachers need a support group when using any teaching model to help them find what works for their class and what doesn't. In My Big Campus, a community of teachers are there to lend support and learn.

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