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English language teacher

Good questions, no doubt

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Good questions, no doubt about it. I always try to help my students think. Simple questions get them nowhere, but there is a problem.Sometimes answering such questions need background information, if they don't you get no feed backs, what do you think?

Mentor, Teaching Consultant

Excellent questions! Open

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Excellent questions!
Open ended, inviting and simple. Any question we ask, while already knowing the answer, is not really a question. It is using power over the other person. Genuine questions, like these, spring from our interest to know more and engage in dialogue - which is VERY important for deep learning. http://notesfromnina.wordpress.com/2012/11/03/open-and-honest-communicat...

Life long early childhood teacher and administrator.

My guideline as an early

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My guideline as an early childhood teacher was, "Don't ask them anything I already know." Learning should be conversation, not interrogation.

4/5 teacher in multi-age classroom in Charter school in Los Angeles

I LOVE these questions!

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I LOVE these questions! Another to add to the list that a friend shared with me is: when a child answers, "I don't know", ask them, "What would you say if you DID know?". I always get amazing results from this line of questioning!!

Co-founder of a project based learning institute

These questions connect very

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These questions connect very nicely to the work of Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) which use similar questions to prompt thinking around a displayed image. Work worth checking out!

NILD educational therapist

I am a huge proponent of

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I am a huge proponent of quality questioning. I find when students are engaged we can move them into their personal zone of proximal development (ZPD). With the teacher asking thought- provoking, higher level questions, the student is able to progress farther then he or she might think possible. In educational therapy, we utilize the wait time as well as teaching students to say something like, "Wait a minute and let me think." When our classrooms are safe places where respect for one another is valued, the student is more willing to take thinking to higher levels without fear of feeling stupid.
If a teacher knows a student is slow in processing, a good idea is to let the student know the question ahead of time or ask the question and come back to the student after a longer wait time. Another thought is to call on students in different ways, not always calling on the same students. I like the turn and talk method also. Thank you for your informative post.

Yes, these are fantastic

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Yes, these are fantastic questions. They are questions that get the child thinking vs. a simple yes or no response. Your questions are great models for the kids when it comes to them coming up with their own questions. It is so important for kids to come up with ways to solve their own problems and it all begins with questions.

Private Academy secondary level

Keeping it simple is the best

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Keeping it simple is the best approach, but requires a thoughtful approach to get students to respond. These open ended questions are great and get students talking. That's my goal.

I frequently use these

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I frequently use these questions and the turn and talk ....so important, especially in middle school! I use a modified #5 question, "what questions do you still have or what didn't I make clear for you?" Takes the worry off the student that if they didn't understand something and the "turn and talk" didn't clarify, it is still okay to ask questions! Thank for this!

High School Library Teacher in Massachusetts

I love these questions! Not

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I love these questions! Not only do they get kids to think for themselves, instead of the teacher just asking a question to which she/he already knows the answer, but it also models the critical thinking process for the students. Simple, yet powerful.

Thanks for sharing!

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