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Writer, teacher of writers, and mother of two budding writers

I know I'm a little behind on

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I know I'm a little behind on commenting on this blog, Todd, but I had to make a nod to the Aristotle-based lesson. Kudos! I plan to share this with an adjunct instructor at BCCC who recently asked me for advice on teaching pathos, ethos and logos. I didn't have much to offer. Now I do. Thanks!

Editorial Assistant and Blogger

Good idea, but

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Hi Gloria,

Your critique is right, of course. I generally find that students laugh at the product reviews. That's a good place to start--but only a start. Thank you for taking the time to comment.

Secondary Education student in Chicago

Good idea, but...

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I love the idea of engaging today's kids with classical rhetoric, but I'm a little disappointed in the 21st century texts offered as examples here. With all the issues of social, political, and historical importance that might be interesting to students, how worth their time is it to read and analyze consumer product reviews? I hope the idea here is just to use the reviews and tweets as a quick introduction to the concepts of ethos, logos, and pathos before moving on to some of the meatier material that can be found on the sites listed at the end of this blog post: TED talks, Common Craft, etc.

Editorial Assistant and Blogger

Aristotle Smiling

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Hi Kelle,

I'm impressed that these proofs still hold up! Thanks for commenting.

-Todd

I would have loved lessons

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I would have loved lessons like this back when I was in school! Especially appreciate the examples of the review of Tuscan Whole Milk and the tweet about "Drive." I know that classical principles are often used in modern times, but it still tickles me to think about students making Aristotelian advertisements.

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