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Thanks for sharing your ideas

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Thanks for sharing your ideas with me. I have struggled with the choice of should I or should I not send students to the office. As the new year approaches, I'm interested to try your techniques for dealing with my disruptive students. I really liked what you said about talking to students one on one instead of in front of other students. This is something that I have seen other teachers do and it think it embarrasses the students and that is something that you do not want to do!!!!!

Great post! Classroom

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Great post! Classroom management is a topic I feel I could improve in. I always felt that the better you get to know the students and show them that you care, the better easier the classroom management takes place. I tend to ask students to leave into the hallway when they are being troublesome, and will speak with them a few moments later. I wonder if this is something I should avoid doing, and if asking students to stay after class would work better.

Thanks

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I never get tired of reading about classroom management; I teach sixth grade all subjects in an inner city school and let me say I have seen it all. I have seen the egregious and most volatile behaviors. I work with the shining students of under privileged homes and let me say that whether the child comes from affluent or low ses background the key is to get to know the student. The underlying reason for the acting out is the key to changing that child's attitude toward class. Thank you so much for this great blog because many educators like myself can always use a helping hand in this never ending struggle with classroom management!!

I Don't Send 'Em

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I learned through my 7 years of teaching to NOT send a student of mine to the office unless I have NO OTHER OPTIONS. I have a system in place...safe seat, buddy seat, recovery place, that makes my life easier...I blog about it here: http://msjessicareeves.edublogs.org/category/classroom-management-discip...

Hopefully I can help someone else, just as your article has. Thanks!

Jess

Professor of Ed. Tech and Research Methods, Partner Dionysius Technologies

Technology & Responsibility

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Recent piece on "Technology and Responsibility" and how to act proactively. Based on the "Parenting with Love & Logic" framework.
http://www.adn.com/2011/06/15/1918737/link-high-tech-skills-to-good.html

Professor of Ed. Tech and Research Methods, Partner Dionysius Technologies

Technology & Responsibility

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Building on the "Parenting with Love & Logic" framework, here's a recent editorial proposed a structure for resolving discipline problems proactively. http://www.adn.com/2011/06/15/1918737/link-high-tech-skills-to-good.html

Elementary teacher in training, at the University of Florida

Mr. Provenzano, Thank you for

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Mr. Provenzano,

Thank you for sharing this post! I have not yet begun teaching, and one of the things that frightens me the most is the possibility of failing to enact a successful classroom management program. Particularly if I work with older students, I'm afraid they will not respect me and I will find myself in the sort of "showdown" scenarios that you described. Your suggestions are straightforward and easy to follow. I will definitely try out these steps to classroom management in the future!

One thing I always advise the

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One thing I always advise the younger teachers in our department is that they do not need to prove their authority over their misbehaving students by smugly putting them on the spotlight.

I'm a big fan of the power of positive attention, as I wrote in my blog post here: http://luria-learning.blogspot.com/2011/05/nail-biting-and-power-of-posi...

I believe we can also apply the same technique here.

Sacha

Throughout my many

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Throughout my many conversations with teachers, I have heard time and time again how they feel bad for the rest of the class because they spend all their time and energy on just a few students. These teachers are correct, it's not fair. Yet, they continue to give more attention to these disruptive students, in which I believe, increases the likelihood that this undesired behavior will continue.

According to Michael Linsin, “When you attend to poorly behaved students more often, you’re communicating to them in a subtle but clear way that they’re different, that they don’t have what it takes to control themselves like other students, so they need extra attention.”

I believe you hit the nail on the head. Provide small re-directs and simply move on. When it becomes a bigger problem, simply talk with the student on his/her own time privately such as before lunch or athletics. Reframe from interrupting valuable instructional time. It isn't fair to the rest of the class. For more readings on this subject, visit http://brainvibeforeducators.blogspot.com/2011/06/never-smile-until-chri...

Great Post and great job at caring enough to resolve problems with your students!

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