Comments (26)

Comment RSS

Professional Development

Was this helpful?
0

I found this blog very informative. I am currently a graduate student and in one of our assignments we dicussed how important it is to be involved and particpate in professional development. I believe that professional development can help us recruit and retain effective teachers to use in the classroom. I believe that in our school system we have great teachers who could become greater if they are educated and informed of new information and practices to use in classroom. Highly qualified teachers are the best resources and tool we can give to our students.

Professional Development

Was this helpful?
0

I found this blog very informative. I am currently a graduate student and in one of our assignments we dicussed how important it is to be involved and particpate in professional development. I believe that professional development can help us recruit and retain effective teachers to use in the classroom. I believe that in our school system we have great teachers who could become greater if they are educated and informed of new information and practices to use in classroom. Highly qualified teachers are the best resources and tool we can give to our students.

Fifth grade teacher

Thanks K Teacher

Was this helpful?
0

Thank you for your thoughtfulness in providing the Danielson book reference for me. I look forward to taking a look at it. I too am the only 5th grade teacher at my private school. It is difficult to collaborate with other 5th grade teachers, so I know how you feel as the only kindergarten teacher at your school. I would be open to sharing any insight you think I may be able to offer, though I understand our grade levels are considerably different. I am truly appreciative for your book suggestion!

Kindergarten teacher from the Tahoe area

I found this blog interesting

Was this helpful?
+1

I found this blog interesting for a few reasons. The data comparing student achievement to teacher effectiveness is not surprising, but it is eye opening and motivating. I teach in a small school district in northern Nevada. We have used the Danielson framework for several years for teacher evauation. The format is valuable for teachers and administrators because it is organized, concise, and informative. Each year we set a goal based on the framework and meet again at the end of the year to evaluate our progress. The format suggested in the blog improves on these steps by adding the other systematic approaches. While it is useful to me to have an administrator's end of year evaluation based on the framework, it would be more helpful to have feedback during the school year. Setting a goal, meeting mid year, reevaluating that goal based on student data, and discussing methods for improvement would be more beneficial. I am also intrigued by the idea of teacher coaches. This format would provide an automatic professional learning community within a school or district. Old and new teachers alike would benefit from this practice. I am the only Kindergarten teacher at my school and I would welcome the chance to collaborate with others about lesson designs, techniques, individual children, and new research. These four steps seem like a sure way to narrow that achievement gap. I am providing the book reference for Michelle because it has the whole framework rubric within it. I hope you find it helpful. There may also be a more recent version of it.
References
Danielson, C. (1996). Enhancing professional practice: A framework for teaching. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Fifth grade teacher

Always Looking for Ways to Improve Student Learning

Was this helpful?
+1

I was initially interested in reading this blog because of the topic and because it spoke of the Chicago Public Schools. Having previously taught in CPS for five years, I can relate well to attending a workshop and being surprised with data provided by the presenter. While I taught in CPS, I worked as a Connector, which later became known as a Golden Teacher, as a liaison from the school in which I taught and DePaul University. I feel like the professional development I received as being a part of this community group was tremendous. Six years later I am still following the practices in an extremely different school environment because of it practicality. I am highly respected at my school by my administration, colleagues, students and their parents.
I found several suggestions in Brian Sims’s blog in which piqued my interest. I currently teach at a private school in Michigan. I am finding the lack of administrative/teacher observation to be an area of concern. I have 14 years of teaching experience, but I am the type of teacher who is constantly craving improvement. While I am very confident about my teaching practices, I wonder, “Is there something more I can be doing for my students?” “Am I meeting all of their needs?” “Should I consider other approaches?” I wonder if there are other teachers out there who feel the same way. I was very curious to find your teaching coaches who can provide feedback in real-time. Can I please get a little more information about this? I would like to present it to my school’s administrative team. I am also really interested in finding a way to incorporate your rubric examples into our classroom observations. Do you have more rubrics that I can take a look at by chance?
If anyone is open to helping me answer a few questions I would be very grateful.
1. How can I monitor my practices on my own objectively?
2. How I can receive feedback on my teaching approaches outside of my school?
3. How can I tactfully request to be observed my school’s administration?
4. Is there anyone who would like to watch a lesson I present and offer feedback? I would be willing to reciprocate.
5. How do you monitor to progress of student learning?
Thank you for taking time to read this this. I will be anxious to see your comments.

Michelle

English teacher, Mississippi

Developing the Talent We Already Have is Key

Was this helpful?
+1

This is one of the most thoughtful and informative pieces I've seen on working with the teachers who choose to remain in struggling schools to make a real difference for students. In much of the noise around education reform, I think we have lost track of how many good, competent teachers there are already working. More important, we've not paid enough attention to how much better many of our current teachers could be with proper support and development. Veteran teachers are a rich resource, and it is both cruel and wasteful not to bring out their full potential in the classroom.

see more see less