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High School social studies teacher from St. Paul, MN

I really like this list! To

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I really like this list! To #9: Wishful Teaching, I would add that frequent easy, and usually informal assessments would also help to eliminate "hoping" that the students learned and turn it into "knowing" what they learned and what they didn't learn yet.

I would also add a #21: Getting Angry with a Student (and Showing It). I find that every time that I show my anger with a student, I regret it. Even if the student's behavior is really rediculous, getting angry or raising my voice never helps the situation.

Middle School Language Arts Teacher

I absolutely loved reading

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I absolutely loved reading this list! It helped me to realize the extent to which most teachers are alike. I am currently in my sixth year of teaching, yet I am still struggling with Blunder #10: Rejecting Sensible Footwear. As I type this comment, I have my feet up recovering from a day in some very uncomfortable shoes. My search is on for comfortable footwear that will work well with my attire.

High School English Teacher

Read every word

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Fantastic list! I was reading and nodding in agreement through out your post. This year my school switched from block schedule to 7 period schedule and I found myself going from having 55 students to having 147 students. Last year I read everything that my kids turned in for a grade. This year I quickly found myself floundering while working 12 hours every weekend to grade papers. Thus I have resolved myself to grade some assignments for completion and others for content. I understand that grading for completion cuts back on time spent grading, however I feel that not reading and responding to more assignments leaves me not knowing my students as well as I did last year. Any thoughts?

Editorial Assistant and Blogger

Thanks, Bob. Response to

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Thanks, Bob. Response to literature is so personal. I remember the shock I felt the moment I realized I was twice as old as my students. Of course students are going to prefer different texts than I like.

With kids so fixated on their information devices, getting those pings of dopamine, I wonder if we need to re-conceive how literature is introduced.

Consultant for the Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network

My Favorite Mistake

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Great list, Todd, and an honest rendering from a reflective practitioner. I appreciate you sharing these experiences. My list of instructional blunders is a mile long and a mile deep, but the one that comes to mind at this moment is more philosophical than pedagogical--believing that, through sheer force of will, I could make a student love a text as much as I did. Sometimes you have to be the hammer, sometimes you have to be the nail. Might doesn't always make right.

Editorial Assistant and Blogger

Another blunder

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You're right, Sandra. Those little glitches on the computer that you can fix in seconds at home ALWAYS take so long in front of sixty eyes.

9th Grade Algebra I teacher from Metuchen, New Jersey

My goofs

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I've made the mistake of not doing an activity myself before having the students do it. I once discovered, too late, that the dirt-cheap balloons I bought from a drug store for my 6th grade science class to use to construct model lungs would not inflate no matter how hard they blew into them. Better to use the high-quality balloons available at good party stores!

President, NJ Association for Middle Level Education

Another blunder

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Great list. Every new teacher should read it so they don't feel like it is just them. I would like to add:
Don't try this at home: Things that work well on your computer at home may not go well in the classroom. There are lots of little nuances with security and networks that can set your class. I have gone in with a great lesson, that just won't work!

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