George Lucas Educational Foundation

PBL Planning

Learn how to prepare for project-based learning's challenges, freedoms, and results -- it can feel chaotic, but there's more intention and structure here than it seems!

  • How to Find Experts for Your Next PBL Unit

    Guest speakers can help teachers convey content and assess students’ understanding, and they may be easier to find than you’d expect.
    Heather Wolpert-Gawron
  • What to Do When a Project Fails

    When project-based learning doesn’t work out as planned, students can still master content—and teachers can learn something too.
  • Guiding Students to Apply What They Learn

    A state Teacher of the Year used project-based learning to push her students to think critically and apply their learning in math.
  • Project-Based Learning and the Research Paper

    Students take responsibility for their learning and develop solutions for complex problems when their research paper becomes a PBL unit.
  • Projects That Work: Mission to Mars

    Physics students assume the role of aerospace engineers to explore the real-world problem of how to land a rover on Mars.
  • Staying On Task During Project-Based Learning

    Brief daily meetings give students working in groups the structure to hold each other accountable on long-term projects.
  • Twenty Ideas for Engaging Projects

    Twenty ideas for getting engaging projects going in your classroom.
    Suzie Boss
  • Getting Started With Project-Based Learning (Hint: Don’t Go Crazy)

    A handful of tips to help teachers ease into PBL without getting overwhelmed.
  • A PBL Unit With Lessons for Teachers

    A project-based learning unit that left students feeling unenthusiastic had valuable lessons for the teachers who prepared it.
  • Resources for Getting Started With Project-Based Learning

    Explore Edutopia's curated compilation of online resources for understanding and beginning to implement project-based learning.
  • Making Projects Accessible

    To get started with student-led, project-based work, teachers can try the 5E instructional model.
  • 10 Ready-to-Borrow Project Ideas

    As you consider the following project possibilities, ask yourself: Would this project help my students meet important learning goals? Would my students find it engaging?
  • How to Write Effective Driving Questions for Project-Based Learning

    Good driving questions are written to help guide the teacher and the student.
  • 3 Reads to Inspire Your Teaching Practice

    Find ideas on student engagement, deeper inquiry, and project-based learning, whether you read on your own or in a book study group.
  • How Can We Survive on Mars?

    A fifth-grade project-based learning unit harnesses excitement about Mars to develop science, math, engineering, and literacy skills.