George Lucas Educational Foundation

PBL Planning

Learn how to prepare for project-based learning's challenges, freedoms, and results -- it can feel chaotic, but there's more intention and structure here than it seems!

  • 3 Common PBL Problems—and Solutions

    Ideas for how to overcome issues that teachers new to project-based learning frequently encounter.
    John McCarthy
  • How to Use a Play for Project-Based Learning

    Seventh graders staging an adaptation of A Christmas Carol work on literary and historical analysis as well as the design process.
  • How to Find Experts for Your Next PBL Unit

    Guest speakers can help teachers convey content and assess students’ understanding, and they may be easier to find than you’d expect.
  • Project-Based Learning and the Research Paper

    Students take responsibility for their learning and develop solutions for complex problems when their research paper becomes a PBL unit.
  • Projects That Work: Mission to Mars

    Physics students assume the role of aerospace engineers to explore the real-world problem of how to land a rover on Mars.
  • Staying On Task During Project-Based Learning

    Brief daily meetings give students working in groups the structure to hold each other accountable on long-term projects.
  • Twenty Ideas for Engaging Projects

    Twenty ideas for getting engaging projects going in your classroom.
    Suzie Boss
  • Getting Started With Project-Based Learning (Hint: Don’t Go Crazy)

    A handful of tips to help teachers ease into PBL without getting overwhelmed.
  • A PBL Unit With Lessons for Teachers

    A project-based learning unit that left students feeling unenthusiastic had valuable lessons for the teachers who prepared it.
  • Guiding Students to Apply What They Learn

    A state Teacher of the Year used project-based learning to push her students to think critically and apply their learning in math.
  • Resources for Getting Started With Project-Based Learning

    Explore Edutopia's curated compilation of online resources for understanding and beginning to implement project-based learning.
  • What to Do When a Project Fails

    When project-based learning doesn’t work out as planned, students can still master content—and teachers can learn something too.
  • Making Projects Accessible

    To get started with student-led, project-based work, teachers can try the 5E instructional model.
  • 10 Ready-to-Borrow Project Ideas

    As you consider the following project possibilities, ask yourself: Would this project help my students meet important learning goals? Would my students find it engaging?
  • How to Write Effective Driving Questions for Project-Based Learning

    Good driving questions are written to help guide the teacher and the student.