George Lucas Educational Foundation

Back to School

The start of the 2020–21 school year will be unlike any we’ve ever seen before. Whether your school is planning on a virtual, in-person, or hybrid approach, you can count on us to help you navigate the new year.

  • Planning Lessons With the Student Experience in Mind

    Providing students with clear directions and easy-to-navigate content is especially important during distance learning.
    Sarah Kesty
  • Prepping to Teach World Language Classes Either Online or In Person

    Starting the year by creating a strong community and tapping into the target culture is a good strategy no matter where students are learning.
  • Reflections—and Lessons Learned—From Remote Learning

    Experiences during remote learning inspire a teacher to reconsider—and refresh—her curriculum for the fall.
  • How to Plan When You Don’t Know What to Plan For

    What school will look like in the fall is still uncertain for most of the U.S., but teachers can develop flexible plans that work for distance and in-class teaching.
  • 3 Keys to a Better 2020–21

    In response to the upheaval of the pandemic, researchers and the leaders of over 100 schools focused on three fundamental areas of education, whether it’s in person or virtual.
  • Relationships Matter More Than Rules

    Community building in the classroom starts on day one. Try these strategies to begin forging strong relationships.
    Rebecca Alber
  • A More Engaging Back to School Night

    Intentionally fostering interactions among teachers, parents, and community partners helped one school create a more inviting event.
  • Parents: 19 Meaningful Questions You Should Ask Your Child's Teacher

    Back-to-school content is usually focused on teachers and students, and as these two groups will have the largest workload ahead of them, that makes sense. But for students, the ultimate support system is not an expert teacher, but an informed and supportive family.
  • SMART Goal Setting With Your Students

    SMART goals are specific, measurable, action-oriented, rigorous, and tracked. Help your students develop them through a series of ongoing peer interviews.
  • Using Learning Stations to Kick Off the Year

    An engaging way for students to get to know each other, review the syllabus, and decide on classroom agreements.
  • The Power of the Positive Phone Call Home

    Calling students’ parents or guardians with good news encourages more good behavior and creates strong teacher-student bonds.
  • Rules and Routines in the Classroom

    An argument for keeping hard rules to a minimum.
  • Breaking the Ice With Student-Made Videos

    Combining the six-word memoir with a film containing six shots gives students a way to introduce themselves at the beginning of the year.
  • Outstanding in Your Field: What It Takes to Be a Great Teacher

    How does one advance from good teaching into greatness? It takes a tremendous deal of reflection and the will to change.
  • A Place for Learning: The Physical Environment of Classrooms

    It's conventional wisdom that different types of instruction require different seating arrangements. It's also a no-brainer that classrooms should be inviting, environments that make students feel good to be there. Unfortunately, over the years I've visited classroom after classroom where conventional wisdom appeared to be disregarded. So here's a short course.

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George Lucas Educational Foundation