George Lucas Educational Foundation

All Grades

Explore and share tips, strategies, and resources for helping students develop across any grade. 

  • Computational Thinking is Critical Thinking—and Belongs in Every Subject

    Identifying patterns and groupings is a useful way of thinking not just for computer scientists but for students in all fields.
    Laura Lee
  • Creating a Student-Run Museum in Your Classroom

    Letting students establish a museum exhibit with everyday items offers an opportunity to sharpen their storytelling skills.
  • For Teachers, Risking Failure to Improve Practice

    One teacher insists that failure isn’t an endpoint; it’s an opportunity for learning and improvement.
  • 10 Powerful Community-Building Ideas

    Strategies for ensuring that students in every grade feel like they’re part of the classroom community.
    Emelina Minero
  • A Two-Step Process for Reducing Chronic Absenteeism

    Getting students back in the building is just step one—next comes fostering a positive school climate so that they want to stay.
  • 5 Highly Effective Teaching Practices

    We teachers are always looking to innovate, so, yes, it's essential that we try new things to add to our pedagogical bag of tricks. But it's important to focus on purpose and intentionality -- and not on quantity. So what really matters more than "always trying something new" is the reason behind why we do what we do.
  • 5 Quick Classroom-Management Tips for Novice Teachers

    When it comes to managing a classroom, new teachers mostly learn on the fly, but here are some ideas you can use right away.
  • 15 Questions to Replace ‘How Was School Today?’

    These questions will help you draw out important information from your kids.
  • Multiple Intelligences: What Does the Research Say?

    Proposed by Howard Gardner in 1983, the theory of multiple intelligences has revolutionized how we understand intelligence. Learn more about the research behind his theory.
  • The Teacher Curse No One Wants to Talk About

    Knowledge is a curse. Knowing things isn't bad itself, but it causes unhealthy assumptions -- such as forgetting how hard it was to learn those things in the first place. It's called the Curse of Knowledge. In this post, we'll identify how the Curse of Knowledge affects educators. Then we'll outline seven ways to alleviate the curse. The ultimate goal is to improve instruction.
  • Teaching With a Chronic Illness

    A few simple strategies can help teachers who have a chronic illness like multiple sclerosis stay effective while protecting their health.
  • Parents: 19 Meaningful Questions You Should Ask Your Child's Teacher

    Back-to-school content is usually focused on teachers and students, and as these two groups will have the largest workload ahead of them, that makes sense. But for students, the ultimate support system is not an expert teacher, but an informed and supportive family.
  • 5 Ways to Make Class Discussions More Exciting

    Classroom discussions have been a staple of teaching forever, beginning with Socrates. I have taught using discussions, been a student in discussions, and observed other teachers' discussions thousands of times -- at least. Some have been boring, stifling or tedious enough to put me to sleep. Others have been so stimulating that I was sad to see them end. The difference between the two is obviously how interesting the topic is, but equally important is the level of student participation.