George Lucas Educational Foundation

All Grades

Explore and share tips, strategies, and resources for helping students develop across any grade. 

  • Social and Emotional Learning

    10 Powerful Community-Building Ideas

    Strategies for ensuring that students in every grade feel like they’re part of the classroom community.
  • Student Engagement

    Working to Grow Students’ Trust and Respect

    A five-step framework for cultivating the strong relationships with students that are critical for their learning.
  • Social and Emotional Learning

    SEL Skill Development During Recess and PE

    Focus, emotion regulation, and goal setting are social and emotional learning skills that teachers can address during recess and PE.
  • Classroom Management

    30 Techniques to Quiet a Noisy Class

    Most teachers use silencing methods, such as flicking the lights or ringing a call bell. This article explores some additional ideas categorized by grade bands.
  • Curriculum Planning

    5 Highly Effective Teaching Practices

    We teachers are always looking to innovate, so, yes, it's essential that we try new things to add to our pedagogical bag of tricks. But it's important to focus on purpose and intentionality -- and not on quantity. So what really matters more than "always trying something new" is the reason behind why we do what we do.
  • Social and Emotional Learning

    Morning Meetings From Pre-K to 12th Grade

    Daily discussions and team-building activities meet the physical, social and emotional, and spiritual needs of students.
  • Professional Development

    11 Habits of an Effective Teacher

  • Classroom Management

    5 Quick Classroom-Management Tips for Novice Teachers

    When it comes to managing a classroom, most of what we learn as new teachers is trial by fire. It's also smart to heed the advice of those who have walked -- and stumbled -- before you. If you are struggling with discipline, here are five tips that you can start using right away.
  • Parent Partnership

    15 Questions to Replace ‘How Was School Today?’

    These questions will help you draw out important information from your kids.
  • Teacher Leadership

    6 Scaffolding Strategies to Use With Your Students

    Support every student by breaking learning up into chunks and providing a concrete structure for each.
  • Classroom Management

    Energy and Calm: Brain Breaks and Focused-Attention Practices

    When presented with new material, standards, and complicated topics, we need to be focused and calm as we approach our assignments. We can use brain breaks and focused-attention practices to positively impact our emotional states and learning. They refocus our neural circuitry with either stimulating or quieting practices that generate increased activity in the prefrontal cortex, where problem solving and emotional regulation occur.
  • Teaching Strategies

    The Teacher Curse No One Wants to Talk About

    Knowledge is a curse. Knowing things isn't bad itself, but it causes unhealthy assumptions -- such as forgetting how hard it was to learn those things in the first place. It's called the Curse of Knowledge. In this post, we'll identify how the Curse of Knowledge affects educators. Then we'll outline seven ways to alleviate the curse. The ultimate goal is to improve instruction.
  • Multiple Intelligences

    Multiple Intelligences: What Does the Research Say?

    Proposed by Howard Gardner in 1983, the theory of multiple intelligences has revolutionized how we understand intelligence. Learn more about the research behind his theory.
  • Student Engagement

    5 Ways to Make Class Discussions More Exciting

    Classroom discussions have been a staple of teaching forever, beginning with Socrates. I have taught using discussions, been a student in discussions, and observed other teachers' discussions thousands of times -- at least. Some have been boring, stifling or tedious enough to put me to sleep. Others have been so stimulating that I was sad to see them end. The difference between the two is obviously how interesting the topic is, but equally important is the level of student participation.