George Lucas Educational Foundation

Diversity

Find resources to help build an inclusive school community for students from different cultural, socioeconomic, and linguistic backgrounds and for children with unique instructional needs.

  • Social and Emotional Learning
    Visit a pair of Nashville middle schools born out of the belief that strong social and emotional learning practices improve academic outcomes.
  • Education Equity
    Being open to talking about race helps foster safety and unity in a multicultural classroom. Here are nine tips to help you prepare.
  • Global Education
    Schools all over the world are using digital tools to help students collaborate and build cultural understanding with distant peers.
  • English-Language Learners
    In an excerpt from his book with fellow teacher Katie Hull Sypnieski, blogger Larry Ferlazzo looks at a few basic ways to reach students who are learning English as well as the subject at hand.
  • Bullying Prevention
    Discover websites, organizations, articles, planning guides, lesson plans, and other resources dedicated to preventing bullying and harassment.
  • Diversity
    How can teachers prepare for diverse classrooms? There isn't a definitive answer, but there is a wealth of resources online. Discover some helpful links for teachers.
  • Education Equity
    Students of color deserve educational materials that better represent their group identities and honor their individuality to include and engage them in their learning experience.
  • Interest-Based Learning
    An outgrowth of school integration in the '60s, magnet schools remain models of progressive education, featuring learning themes, diversity, innovative curriculum, rigor, and community involvement.
  • Culturally Responsive Teaching
    Children’s early experiences shape what they imagine to be possible. Here are six strategies for giving them positive, familiar examples of who and what they can be.
  • Education Equity
    To create equity in their schools, educators must seek to validate and acknowledge students, expose and reveal the unseen, encourage questioning, and facilitate reflection.