Edublogs We Love: Ten Top Stops for Internet Interaction

These Web sites are the cornerstones of a vast online educational community.

These Web sites are the cornerstones of a vast online educational community.
This is a multipart article. Click here to go to the beginning.

It's seems everybody has a blog these days, including teachers and other people who are passionate about education. Here are some of the most popular sources of big and deep thoughts:

2¢ Worth
What makes David Warlick's 2¢ priceless is a mix of intense curiosity, refreshing enthusiasm, and photos that speak of a wry and observant personality.

Around the Corner v2
Miguel Guhlin's blog features the quote "Courage can't see around corners, but goes around them anyway." Look past its uninspiring interface, and you'll find just this kind of pithy talk.

Dangerously Irrelevant
In ongoing debates about education, the borderline-irrelevant topics often prove enlightening. The only danger is in not paying attention to them.

Joanne Jacobs
Jacobs practices a kind of free linking and free thinking that takes you from country to country and from religion to technology to health, all in the orbit of education.

Kathy Schrock's Kaffeeklatsch
The keyword in the name of this blog refers to an informal gathering to drink coffee and chat. As a Web barista, Schrock serves a compelling educational brew.

Leader Talk
Written by school leaders for school leaders, proof that those at the top are fighting for change, too.

Moving at the Speed of Creativity
Uses plain language to highlight exciting technology and innovation in education.

NYC Educator
It may be the Daily Show of education blogs, combining parody, retro images, and a skeptical sensibility in service of a true concern for our educational future.

PBS Teachers: Learning.Now
Checking out the well-crafted entries on this site is like a one-on-one with a patient mentor: lots of wisdom, few wasted words.

weblogg-ed
As its snowy mountain logo implies, Will Richardson's weblogg-ed is a breath of fresh air. Without clutter, his entries can be meditated on in singular simplicity. (Full disclosure: He's on The George Lucas Educational Foundation's National Advisory Council. This blog reminds us why.)

This article originally published on 9/6/2007

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Comments (20)

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Anonymous (not verified)

Parlez-vous SQL?

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So, only foreign blogs written in English should be considered as worthwhile international blogs? Stephen, you're confusing me!

Anonymous (not verified)

Top 10?

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I too agree that for the amount of time put into the blog...it can't be in the top 10. Yes, she is respected for many other efforts.

Stephen Downes (not verified)

Well, this just came into my

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Well, this just came into my email this evening (Thursday, Septenber 13):

"Edublogs We Love: Ten Top Stops for
Internet Interaction"

It seems to me that the use of the phrase 'Top Ten' kind of belies this:

"Remember, though, that this list was meant to be nothing more than what the headline implies: Edublogs We Love. I wouldn’t read any dark jingoism into the selections."

And I would add, in response to this:

"But I'd say that the primary reason international blogs didn't pop up was that, frankly, we can’t fairly judge blogs whose language we don’t understand"

that hundreds of millions of people outside the United States speak English, and so language is utterly no reason to fail to consider international blogs.

Anonymous (not verified)

Where's Joyce Valenza?

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Librarians are teachers too, you know:
joycevalenza.edublogs.org

Jim Daly (not verified)

Edublogging

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Thanks for the comments; much appreciated.
Remember, though, that this list was meant to be nothing more than what the headline implies: Edublogs We Love. I wouldn’t read any dark jingoism into the selections. We solicited input from many people on their favorite blogs, and these were the ones most often cited. It also isn't a ranking, as one reader implies. It's just, well, blogs we love. Take it at that.
But I'd say that the primary reason international blogs didn't pop up was that, frankly, we can’t fairly judge blogs whose language we don’t understand. There may be some excellent Chinese, French, Italian, Czech, Spanish, Japanese, etc. edublogs, and - if so - please tell us about them. Sounds like you all have some ideas. We can include them in our international issue (best ideas from educational communities around the world) which will come out in February. Meanwhile, thanks for the reminder that we need to look past our own borders.

Jim Daly
Editor in Chief, Edutopia

Ewan McIntosh (not verified)

The Web Is [(Us)Ing] Us

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Many of these are good entertaining reads. Nearly all of them talk about what 'we' (whoever that is) should or could be doing.

Unfortunately, the blogs in Scotland and elsewhere in the world that talk about children and teachers who have been doing what they 'should' have been doing for months or years don't even get a glimpse.

Edutopia's a great international URL to hold - if I owned it I wouldn't abuse it by only providing an American-centric view of education.

Anonymous (not verified)

While I love and admire

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While I love and admire Kathy Schrock, and truly appreciate all she has done for promoting technology in education, I can't say the same about her blog. And to have it ranked in the "top ten"??? Sorry. I have to disagree.

Stephen Downes (not verified)

Here is a proper

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Here is a proper international list of edublogs (all in English):

http://www.downes.ca/edurss/feeds.htm

Graham Wegner (not verified)

Hmmm, I think Stephen's right...

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I've explored the US centric view of edublogging - http://gwegner.edublogs.org/2007/07/02/the-olympics-effect-theory/ - before and can only concur with Stephen. Look around at some of the places he suggests and you'll find that some of the issues that US education is exploring as "things to do" are already "things being done" in many areas of the globe. How was this list chosen?

Stephen Downes (not verified)

They may be a cornerstone,

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They may be a cornerstone, but this selection of weblogs - which are all American - represents only a small segment of the wider community.

Most education weblogs, and many of the best education weblogs, are published around the world. This includes numerous weblogs from Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and, of course, the UK.

It is really quite astonishing that the author would focus on U.S. weblogs only - and, sadly, revealing.

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