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WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation

Archive of August 27, 2009 Webinar: "The Fundamentals of Funding: How to Identify, Write, and Submit Grants for School and Program Initiatives"

On August 27, to expand on our coverage of the federal stimulus package for education, we drew on the grant-writing experience of school administrator Kathleen Petersen, also a member of The George Lucas Educational Foundation's National Advisory Council. She demystified the process of researching, designing, writing, and implementing grants.

As is often the case, the number of questions from our community far exceeded our allotted time, but we've put together the following resources to help you get the most out of our members-only Edutopia webinars:

About the Host

Grace Rubenstein

Grace Rubenstein is a senior producer with Edutopia magazine and Edutopia.org. Prior to joining The George Lucas Educational Foundation in 2005, she was an education reporter at the Lawrence, Massachusetts, Eagle-Tribune and a Boston Globe correspondent. She has won awards from the New England Press Association and the New England Associated Press News Executives Association.

About the Presenter

Kathleen Petersen

Kathleen Petersen, a member of the Foundation's National Advisory Council, retired as principal of Santa Clara Elementary School, in Santa Clara, Utah, in spring 2009, but remains with the Washington County School District as director of Title I programming. She has won grants totaling over $1 million to create computer labs and a paperless sixth grade. Read more.

Comments (12)Sign in or register to postSubscribe to comments via RSS

Steven Mason's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

What the are the typical a) hourly fees (and total hours required); and b) contingency percentage fees in lieu of hourly ones (e.g., 3%, 5%, 10%) for professional grant-writing consultants.

david wallace's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Q: I teach at a fairly affluent school, and have been turned down for grants because we are not a Title 1 school. Any suggestions for getting grants?

I am a music teacher in a suburban elementary school in Denver

Betty Ray's picture
Betty Ray
Director of Programming and Innovation @Edutopia
Staff

Hi All -

Thanks to all who joined us for this webinar! If you had a question that didn't get answered, please feel free to ask it here. Kathy will be checking back to this page to answer any outstanding questions.

Thanks!

Betty Ray
Community Manager
Edutopia.org

Betty Ray's picture
Betty Ray
Director of Programming and Innovation @Edutopia
Staff

s there a Twitter service, like Grantsalert.com, that can update the bajillion opportunities that are out there?

Kathy's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

David,
I, too, have been at a non-Title school for the last five years. It was a surprise to me, coming from a Title I school, how many grants are not available without the poverty status. It took additional searching, but I was able to find RFP's that would allow us to apply. I also attached letters to several of the grant applications that did not require Title I status, but had poverty level as a piece of the evaluation. In the letter I stated that although we did not have a high level of poverty, we did have individual children who suffered because they were growing up in poverty but their home boundary did not put them at ta title school. In the letter, I would tell about several of the students and what needed to be done to level the playing field with the more affluent children. Don't give up; the RFP's are out there. We just received a million dollar grant to pay for a certified music teacher for 5 years - unheard of in Utah.

Anna Strauss's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Hello,

I am researching education grants for a middle school in Northern California and for an educational non-profit. In researching potential local donors, I have come across the term "re-selected", as no need to apply because the company/foundation funds only pre-selected organizations. What does this mean and how does one become a pre-selected organization? Thank you.

Anna Strauss's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Hello. I am currently pursuing funding opportunities for my local middle school in Northern California as well as a non-profit educational website. In the course of my research, I have come across the term "pre-selected", as in "no need to apply, grants are given to pre-selected organizations." What does that term mean and, how does an organization become pre-selected? Thank you.

Grace Rubenstein's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Great suggestion, Oscar! I personally know one teacher who has had more than 30 grants funded on Donorschoose.org, totaling nearly $10,000. For anyone who wants more info on Donorschoose.org, you can find it in this Edutopia story from last year: http://www.edutopia.org/donorschoose-school-supplies-donation

Grace Rubenstein
Senior Producer
Edutopia

zaida's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Most of the funding are available for public schools. I work at a private school. Does anyone know of any organization that offers funding to private school?

Steven Faircloth's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

I had certain questions to ask but I find they are already covered by other people. It will be nice to know the answers.

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