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Peggy Bryant (not verified)

I use the Layout method of

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I use the Layout method of releasing the graphic from the text line in MS Word however the same procedure does not work when using MS Outlook in mail messages. The graphics can be moved from one margin to the other, but never to the middle of the message. How can this be solved?
Carolyn Stanley (not verified)

I have been helping students

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I have been helping students with handling the wrapping of graphics for years. The default on our computers is for the graphics to enter "in line with text" which means they can only be repositioned by moving the cursor in an area of text. I have students use the page icon with the little dog on the picture toolbar to choose a wrapping option that suits their needs. It might be float on top of text, tight, top and bottom, etc. They need to figure out which one works best for them. If the picture toolbar is not showing, they can right click on the graphic and select, "show picture tool bar." If you are on a computer that saves preferences. (Ours reset with DeepFreeze), you can go to Tools - Options - Edit Tab. About half way down there is a field which shows Microsoft Office Word as the picture editor. Under that is a field where you can choose how to "Insert/Past picture as". On my teaching computer, which holds preferences, I choose "in front of text." Once my picture is in my document, I might use another wrap option as necessary. As for at the comment on "edit wrap points", I have never played with this. Thanks! There is always an opportunity to learn something new.
Jamie (not verified)

Lelia, Tight layout makes

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Lelia, Tight layout makes the words go to the exact edge of the graphic. Square layout allows the text to form a square around the graphic. I like this because it makes a clean edge around the graphic.
Karen (not verified)

I learned the "trick" to

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I learned the "trick" to getting graphics - any sort - to move around easily by changing the layout from fellow listserv members. There was nothing in Microsoft help files. I'm happy to say, however, that in Office 2003, one of the options you can change is how pictures/graphics are brought into a word document. By choosing any of the other layout formats except the default "inline with text" one, the graphics are instantly and always movable when inserted....no more having to go to format > layout unless you want to.
Bill Dunsay (not verified)

This is very helpful. Thank

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This is very helpful. Thank you for the explanations. I will try out the tight or square layouts.
Anne Gordon (not verified)

I usually choose "edit wrap

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I usually choose "edit wrap points" from the picture menu. You can completely customize how you want the text to wrap by dragging all the wrap points.
Lelia (not verified)

I have been using the

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I have been using the "tight" layout for quite awhile. However, I am at a loss to explain exactly what that means or why thay allows the graphic to be so much easier to work with. Help? Thanks. Lelia
Trudy (not verified)

Another way I have found to

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Another way I have found to be useful when inserting graphics into Word documents, is the paste special option under the edit menu. You cut the original graphic out of the document and then paste it special. When this is selected, a new window opens and I always choose paste as a picture. This gives me the same results and I don't have to wrap the picture around the words.
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