School-to-Career: What You Can Do

Resources for those interested in school-to-career programs.

Resources for those interested in school-to-career programs.

Educators, employers, labor representatives, students, and parents interested in School-to-Career should visit these recommended Web sites:

National Career Academy Coalition

Career Academy Support Network

National Academy Foundation (business partnerships for American education)

Magnet Schools of America

U.S. Department of Education, Smaller Learning Communities Program

North Central Regional Educational Laboratory (section on Pathways to School Improvement)

This article originally published on 2/22/2001

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Anonymous (not verified)

learning, creativity,public school,private school,dissapointment

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I was a child that always loved to do" "art" but could never do well in Math. My mind just did not seem to want to deal with numbers. Through elementry, middle and finally high school I knew I wanted to go to school to major in art. I attended a community college because my SAT scores were to low to go any place else. SAT scores bring up my tremendous hatred for their popularity to peg people as to whether they are "college material" or not. Anyway, my first art instructor was a trememdous encouragment and I proceded to find satisfaction through the creative process. I have always wanted to understand why we as creative people always had to toe up to the academically gifted mind, they did not have to toe up to our creatively gifted mind. It always seemed that math, science,etc were always so much more an indicator of intellegence, value and worth. We are constantly singing high praises of those who are "bright and gifted" in those subjects, but rarely do we give accolades to those of us who are creatively gifted. A creatively gifted student has a real hard row to hoe. He or she better be able to do math and science and then you can have a little time to be creative. The academically gifted student does not have to toe up to the creative student. Where are the schools that, yes teach math and science, cause I know we have to have them to function in life but, where are the schools the allow the creative student a world to excell in and be showered with praises because they are creatively brilliant? Are they out there?
Enter my son, now turning 25 who went through all the same junk in school that I did. Struggling to do the math, just eaking by....yearning to spend time making wonderful pieces of artwork...but always having to do stuff we could have cared less about. I am not saying that we do not need to learn the 123's and the abc's just find a way to give our minds the classroom WE excel in. So the same ole SAT scores and high school grades kept my son from attending college..cause you just better be ready to do Algebra, Calculus, Physics, blah,blah,blah in order to get a degree. I am at a loss as to how to encourage him now to try to get into a college and try to do well enough in the academics and at the same time be his brilliant creative self. I marvel at his abilities in creating something from nothing. There is absolutely no telling what he could have accomplished if he could have concentrated on his creative abilities. How do you help someone now at his age to find a job doing what he loves to do(package design,theatre props and sets,displays, models using paper, cardboard,etc.....) without trying to get back into a college and somehow get a degree that says he can now get a good job because this sheepskin he now has says he is better for a job than someone who didn't go to college. We do a really good job of discouraging a whole group of really creative people just by telling them well..you can major in art but you gotta do this math and science stuff too. Let's have 2 different kinds of public schools...once you find your strenghts and talents...have a school that allows those students to excel in their strengths! Gosh, a school that encourages you to excell in creativity...WOW

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