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Kerri Wosek (not verified)

I am also beginning a new

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I am also beginning a new Broadcast Class. I am very interested in how the students rose to the task of creating it all "from Scratch". If this can give the students at my school an experience like that, I would be thrilled. I am a bit nervous about not having any kind of lesson plan, I don't know how my administrator would feel about that...but look forward to future postings that give tips and ideas to incorporate that element of freedom into my framework.
Sara DaSilva (not verified)

Congratulations! I, too,

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Congratulations! I, too, have been teaching television production in my elementary school to 4th, 5th, and 6th grade students for over 10 years. We were fortunate to have received a magnet grant which enabled us to renovate a classroom into a state-of-the-art studio complete with a separate control room. We produce a news show every day and also produced a 30-minute kids cooking show completely created, scripted, and edited by the kids. I would be VERY interested in knowing what software and equipment you use and how you were able to broadcast your show locally.
Edna Heller (not verified)

I would love to see some of

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I would love to see some of the student produced work. I have taught a News Broadcasting Class for the last three years in an elective class for 4th through 8th graders, and your article reminded me of my experience. I agree it is one of the best things students can do to feel a special connection to their school and to their own learning. My one regret is not connecting to our community and so our broadcasts are only seen by the students and the parents. I wanted to offer some answers for Kathleen. I think I could help, since my class is on the smaller closed circuit scale. Our broadcasts are taped and viewed at a later date, kids sometimes try to make them seem "real-time" when they do the weather, but it takes about 3 monthes to produce one broadcast. Remember we only meet once a week for 1 1/2 hours. I have two computers in my classroom and we use them both. We use Windows Movie Maker and ArcSoft Movie to create and burn the movie. Student do all the work and I supervise. They brainstorm stories, do the planning and research, interview key players, film the footage or the story on location, download the footage to the computer, record voice overs, edit and create final stories on the computer, add text and transitions, etc. Two students are picked for the desk and they create a opening story, introduce every other story and close the broadcast. Some students are reporters, some are support staff(helping the reporter), and some are camera operators for a story, but students do every job throughout the semester or year if they decide to stay in the elective for all 3 semesters. Sometimes students need time out of a class to get footage, but most of the work is done during the elective. Our broadcasts are about 20 minutes, give or take and they are the most enjoyed show. In fact, students request seeing them over and over, and on any given rainy day recess students watch old broadcasts. I hope this helps you. I am glad you are planning to launch such a project, you will have so much fun and your students will surprise you with their final projects. Cheers.
Roberta Loniewski (not verified)

Great article! Here at

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Great article! Here at Kinnelon High School in Kinnelon, NJ we have been broadcasting a daily news show and a once a week community broadcast for over 7years and it has been a great learning experience and great fun. I currently teach Intro to TV and Video Production, 1st year advanced and 2nd year advanced classes and I never stop enjoying it.
Jerry Silverstein (not verified)

It's great to read about

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It's great to read about video programs in Middle Schools, especially since the technology is becomming more accessible every year. We offered media (which included video production, photography and ultimately computer graphics) as part of the required program at the Shoreham-Wading River Middle School on Long Island since the doors opened in the early seventies. I was privileged to teach five sections of this course to 6-8 th graders for twenty of those years (83 - 2003) and can vouch that this is a perfect medium for Middle School students. They can integrate what they learn about video into so much of their "academic" program, and in a culture that is media driven, students are empowered by understanding the medium as well as the message. Besides the media class where students created original videos, students were able to produce videos for presentations in their academic classes as well as documentaries of other school programs. In addition, we wrote original screenplays and produced "feature films" on video, and a group of students created an end of the year video that was shown on "Eighth Grade Night" in lieu of a graduation ceremony. Though the program began on reel to reel videotape machines, most of what we did was shot in VHS and edited on three stations of editing decks. Now these could all be replaced by more affordable computer based programs. We emphasized script writing and story boarding so that students were engaged in a variety of stages of pre and post production as well as using the cameras so that we could transcend the hardware limitations. Also, by going through all of the stages of preparation, students understood that all media represents a created reality.
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