Should schools increase their emphasis on civic education?

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Scott Bowler (not verified)

Having recently traveled to

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Having recently traveled to a few countries where not only is civics emphasized more than here, but where voting is mandatory, I was humbled. The people we visited with were not only knowledgeable about their own and world politics, but often passionately invoved in debate and action. In a country where more people voted for the latest "American Idol" than in recent elections, we have a real, pervasive, and damaging problem. We as a nation are degenerating into a place of "because I can" and "it feels good" instead of "I should do this because it's the right thing."
Joe Marshall (not verified)

There are too many variables

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There are too many variables involved. I live and teach in a district where attendance is sporadic, parental involvement is there but lacking for those that are in the most need. Often at home, school and school work is a low priority. Yet I always do my best to teach ALL students.
Ronald Paige (not verified)

Schools at all levels, by

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Schools at all levels, by institutionalizing segments of our environment into disciplines that students are then held individually accountable for have lost sight of what it means to be a whole person within a common society. Alas, it is not the student who is at fault for doing what we are holding him or her accountable for; it is the educational system that has lost sight of its holisitc civic mission.
Gloria Piraino (not verified)

The only hope for our nation

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The only hope for our nation to survive into the future is to grow better citizens. We cannot hope to grow better citizens if we do not TEACH them to govern themselves. A knowledge of civics, of history, of how this government is supposed to work, of how it can work is crucial. Skimping on this because of budget cuts or because the subject matter is 'touchy' is a huge disservice to this and all future generations. As a nation of immigrants, with such varied culture and heritage, it is an American imperative to teach our youngsters how to be Americans. Ignoring this will cause OUR heritage to become dilute and eventually to vanish. We are not all Americans by virtue of WHERE we live--but HOW we live. That 'how' needs to be taught.
Dawn (not verified)

Absolutely! If we cannot

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Absolutely! If we cannot teach students how to be functioning members of society, we only have ourselves to blame when they become adults and do not participate in community life. Service has to be experienced before its effect is understood. It's the whole "pay it forward" idea. Kids get into that and respect it.
SOPHIE M. SILBERMAN` (not verified)

HOW CAN WE HAVE AN EDUCATED

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HOW CAN WE HAVE AN EDUCATED ELECTORATE WITHOUT KNOWLEDGE OF CIVICS AND HISTORY? MOST OF THE STUDENTS THAT I ENCOUNTER KNOW VERY LITTLE OR NOTHING AT ALL ABOUT THE POLITICAL PROCESS AND THE DEMOCRACY THAT THIS COUNTRY IS BASED UPON. NOR ARE THEY AWARE OF THE HISTORY THAT LED TO THE CONSTITUTION, THE FOUNDING FATHERS INFLUENCE AND THE NEED TO BE INFORMED WHEN THEY VOTE.
Carole Key (not verified)

How did I learn about

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How did I learn about civility? about what democracy means? about our freedoms and our responsibilities as citizens? I learned at home, but most importantly I learned at school through the modeling of the teachers, the lessons presented in story and song, and the practices that became a part of what we did and what was expected of us. I hope that in my school I continued those same ideals that I learned and that I practice today. To say add another class is or another requirement is not the answer. The answer lies in these teachings being imbedded in all subjects and taught naturally within them.
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