Testing with Tech: The Role of Technology in Supporting and Enhancing Assessment

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Anonymous (not verified)

Technology in the Classroom

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I agree with the comments above. Technology is vital in schools. I believe that technology can make assessments easier and cheaper cost as Grant’s comment explains. Technology is also only going to get better. As it improves, the improvements will slowly take place in the school systems as well as the world. However, I do believe that technology and the computer will not replace the teacher. I know that I learn better, if I have a teacher face-to-face with me. There is a relationship that grows in a face-to-face classroom, that computers can not bring into educating.

Beth Hathaway (not verified)

Grant Wiggins and Barbara

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Grant Wiggins and Barbara Means bring up helpful points about technology providing an important tool in terms of organizing and analyzing test data and providing new and exciting ways for the students to experience assessment and for the teacher to examine it. My question within the realm of assessment technology is, is there any danger in making so many aspects of school entertaining? I know we are only talking about assessment here but it seems like there is a general push toward making school and learning fun, no matter what the context. Are there important skills being lost in the process? I wonder sometimes if the experience of quietly reading a physical book and journaling or essay-writing without any animated, interactive, colorful technology is becoming a lost art. But, maybe it never was an art. I worry that some of the entertaining factors of assessment or instruction that are entering the field lack needed preparation for the mundane parts of the real world.

Kristy Hays (not verified)

Role of Technology

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I believe that technology is the way of the future. There is no stopping the increasing demands of technology in the classroom and for assessment purposes. Teachers are looking for ideas and ways to make their job easier. Students are looking for ways to make learning more exciting. School districts are looking for ways to gather data. Technology is going to meet the needs of a new generation of schools and assessments. The role of technology is endless in providing teachers with different ways to informally and formally assess their students. Remote desktops, tracking changes in word documents, palm pilots, and smart boards are just the beginning. Teachers and administrators will also benefit by tracking assessment results on the Internet. They are able to view results more quickly than by mail and they are able to use the various charts and graphs provided by the test company to analyze the test data and to see their students' strengths and weaknesses. There is no question about the role technology plays in education. It is an important tool that will continue to improve the quality of both instruction and assessment.

Anonymous (not verified)

I really agree with Grant

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I really agree with Grant Wiggins about using portfolios. I believe that creating a portfolio is a great idea when it comes to tracking a student’s progress but also like Grant Wiggins said who wants to look through the whole thing. By having an electronic portfolio a teacher can pick certain things that the student has been struggling on in the past and compare it to the future. This is an excellent idea because teachers do not have the time to go through every little page of every student to find out if they are improving.
I also agree with Barbara Means about if students use technology while doing assessments they do not think of them as tests. It is more like a fun activity that they can do and in the mean time the teacher can monitor their strengths and weaknesses.

Paul Adcock (not verified)

Web Testing Question

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Mr. Alberts
I agree with you that the Web can be used by educators to test students at a low cost, but what I would like to see in such a program, is that the programmers set up the system in such a way that it allows the teachers to make modifications to the test. Each teacher has his own goals and objectives that he teaches to- and for the test to be reliable and fair the teacher has to be able to make minor modifications to the test, to make sure that he is testing to his objectives. I know this will make the scaling more difficult, as not all the student are taking exactly the same test; but is there not a way to set up the testing in such a way as to allow the teacher to modify the test and still make the scaling possible?

Anonymous (not verified)

Opinion

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I think Barbara Wiggins did a great job of addressing the role of technology in assessment. She suggested that technology be used as a form of assessment; however, it does not need to feel like an assessment. Students can be assessed and actually enjoy the process.
Teachers can assess students by asking them to conduct research, type a short essay, prepare a PowerPoint presentation, use a spreadsheet, compile an electronic portfolio, etc. The possibilities are endless. It is just a matter of the teacher being creative when coming up with student assessments.
Technology also plays an important role in analyzing past test scores. This is a great way for teachers to assess student knowledge at the beginning of the semester or school year. Teachers are able to get a better understanding of where they need to start. The utilization of technology is also an effective way to track student progress throughout the semester or school year.
Teachers are also able to provide effective feedback through the utilization of technology. If students have typed a report, essay, etc. on the computer, the teacher can open up the document and provide feedback by highlighting important points, using a different font for comments, etc. It also allows the teacher to provide feedback in a timely manner.
Most students enjoy using technology in the classroom, so if it sparks student interest, use it!

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