Are the presidential candidates talking about public education enough?

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Anonymous (not verified)

Candidates need to be more honest about education

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Candidates need to get candid! They need to talk about the national shame of a million dropouts a year and the failure of city schools to educate poor minority children.

Harriet (not verified)

Politics as usual

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The public education system, even with NCLB, is not an initiative that addresses the needs of a country that presumes to be a leading nation by the majority of its inhabitants. All of the hundreds of trillions of dollars that have gone into preparing generations of children since the 1950’s in the public school system—have only served to prepare most of those children for a lifetime of poverty and despair. Current statistical data have prominently portrayed 60% of the American people to be either the working poor or at poverty level. It is a lifetime of drudge and misery for those 60%, and a large portion of this segment turn to a life of crime costing the American people even more.

It’s like a well-guarded secret, the continue decline of what was once a great nation, camouflaged by credentials and calculated rhetoric. The rhetoric is fueled by the propaganda of the teachers’ unions to continue to support public school as if the consequences to society would be dyer if other options were chosen.

It is no secret that the teachers’ unions are the strongest in the nation, but the true nature of their organizational objective is…The teachers’ unions fund democratic leadership to continue to receive support of their total control of the education initiatives, and the tax dollars that provide lofty salaries and benefit packages for their members. The teachers’ unions do not want any alternatives to educating children as choice programs would provide. They will fight bitterly and with rhetoric that will pull at the heartstrings of the American people—stating that our children will suffer if any money is deflected from public education. The teachers’ unions always go one step further stating that not enough money is being spent on education—and that is where they claim lays the foundation of mediocrity in student achievement levels.

I am a registered democrat, but it is my belief that the good intentions of the democratic party when it comes to helping the working classes have only succeeded to make the working classes dependant on assistance and programs that never really help people reach the place in life where they need to be: the democratic social initiatives are making dependant enablers of us all. With every program constantly requiring increases to funding, the costs are felt more acutely by the 60% of the working poor and poverty level Americans.

An average of ten hours a week—the working class is working just to pay taxes. Whether it is federal, state, local, property, or social security and Medicare (even though SS and Medicare will supposedly be given back to us in retirement, with the uncertainties that are plaguing SS we cannot count on that), these tax obligations are pulling all of us financially and spiritually down. It is no wonder the American people are in serious debt; 25% of their weekly earnings have to go toward paying taxes. Taxes for programs that they have been persuaded, more like brainwashed, to believe will help improve their lives such as the public school system.

The direction of the democratic presidential hopefuls in support of the teachers unions’ initiatives is proposing the abolishment of the NCLB legislation. I never supported the NCLB Act: It has been—and still is my opinion—that if competition were aloud to rein in education we would not need the NCLB Act. But what is the alternative? What are these puppets of the teachers’ unions proposing? Teachers and their unions are complaining that the NCLB act has taken creativity out of teaching and that they’re teaching to standardized tests…what a bunch of ‘bull!’ Is anyone even considering how bad the education system was that the NCLB initiative was instituted? There was never creativity in the majority of public school classrooms! The performance of student achievement levels were so despairing that the NCLB legislation was born, conceived out of an unholy union of greedy self-serving teachers and a pervasive neglect of parents.

The gains since NCLB are only marginal. TRYING TO FIX A BROKEN DOWN SYSTEM WITHIN THE PARAMETERS OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM WILL NEVER BE THE ANSWER. I stand in a minority of the opinion on promoting more choices in educating children outside of the public school arena—but I am in good company with many leading economists and many notable entrepreneurs that see the stifling of the American people from the public education system. I can only hope and pray that the future president of the U.S. will inspire State officials to see the desperate need for changes in how we educate our children since the control of education has fallen on state and local levels.

Anna (not verified)

NO

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No. Presidential candidates neither prioritize public education nor propose viable solutions for its problems.

Anonymous (not verified)

Absolutely not. There's

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Absolutely not. There's been maybe 2 questions about education in all the debates so far. Education is so critical to our nation's future and to my children's futures. It is appalling that we haven't seen more discussion about this important issue.

kathryn (not verified)

Presidentital candidates and education

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No they do not even begin to discuss public/private, after-school, charter, or faith education. Even if they did they would consult the "experts" and political people for their comments. NOne of them have the guts to talk about what is really wrong - or know-how enough to propose anything meaningful.

Peggy Bass (not verified)

Presidential candidates talking public education

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No. Mayor Michael Bloomberg seems to be the only one really being specific about education, and he is not running (yet) for President. My hope is, at the very least, others will jump on his "bandwagon" if for no other reason, to make sure that they pick up on the important issues that he brings to the forefront.

George Falkenhagen (not verified)

education

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Having spent 31 years as a public school teacher and 24 years as an adjunct college instructor and now a college administrator, I find that none of the candicates know or talk enough about education. We have no child left behind which is leaving every child behind. Because of the cuts that my old school district is forced to make the students will not have art and music in the elementary grades and the high school students will be missing business, art and choir. It is time America woke up and realized that funding our most precious resource is needed now not wasting money in Iraq.

Anonymous (not verified)

Politicians and Education

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No, they are not talking about it enough in knowledgeable/realistic terms. Politicians only know what they need to say to which audience. If they really were concerned about education, they would talk to and listen to educators and educational leaders. They are only interested in sound bites. "If our schools are so bad, how did they get where they are?" Oh, I know. They had the money to avoid crummy buildings in dangerous neighborhoods. Their education didn't depend on the "generosity" of politicians in state and federal legislative positions of power.

Mathman6293 (not verified)

Presidental Candidates

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The other night during the debate there was a question on NCLB but the time allowed didn't really give the candidates time to discuss their positions thoroughly. Except Richardson, whos said scrap the whole thing. I tend to agree with that opinion.

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