What is the most effective way to prevent students from cheating?

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Anonymous (not verified)

cheating

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Some students will cheat when there is a possibility to do so. All of the measures mentioned should be used. Also, we subscribe to TURNITIN which picks up on plagiarized reports and other documents, etc. It works well, with a huge database to pull from.

Anonymous (not verified)

cheating vs. collaboration

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Cheating and collaboration are not the same. Collaboration is working together. Cheating is taking credit for someone else's work. Cheating is copying off at test, copying homework, etc. Cheating is when my engineer friend's boss erased names off others' work and put his there. Cheating was when Enron changed the energy rules and then manipulated the grid to steal millions of dollars.
I think it is just so important not to make excuses for lack of integrity and good character.

Scott S. Floyd (not verified)

Ethics anyone?

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Teaching ethics in school should not be a novel idea... but it is.

Barbara (not verified)

Cheating

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Combine open-ended questions with a variety of contructivist projects that cater to student-centered individualized learning styles.

Anonymous (not verified)

all of the above

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all of the above

Anonymous (not verified)

When does cheating actually start?

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Students don't need or want to cheat if they understand what they are being tested over. There is not a need for students to memorize formulas or rules if they understand what they are doing. Starting at a very young age, children need to be introduced to the why of what they are doing and given real world examples that fit into their lives. It is also important that educators don't skip teaching things at their grade level because they don't 'like' to teach it. When students miss out on necessary skills at one level, there are many times that the skill is never fully understood. When students feel comfortable with the skills presented, they don't feel a need to cheat on tests. Many times it is the 'fault of the teacher' that a student feels the need to cheat. Do students not realize that they need to be made accoutable for the work that is given to them? Why do parents and students feel the need to blame the teacher? I feel this whole problem stems from children not taking responsibility for anything and parents or guardians sticking up for their child, even if the child is wrong . . . blame the other person.

Chuck Fellows (not verified)

Cheating

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Please visit the real world occassionally. There "cheating" is called collaboration and it is a required practice. Failure to collaborate usually leads to bad outcomes, such a business failure and/or warfare.

Testing to confirm acquisition of knowledge is ineffective. Let the goals be known and assess via demonstration of competence.

This will require the educational community give up its' assumed ownership of knowlege; require disciplines work together and curriculum be integrated.

The purpose is learning, not competition.

Keith Jaeger (not verified)

Cheating

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Many great comments above. PBL - driven by essential questions - all but eliminates the opportunity or the desire to cheat.

Janet Barnstable (not verified)

Best Case Senerio

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If no one HAD to cheat, perhaps they wouldn't. I remember 'learning' to cheat when I was in 7th grade. It was because the teacher gave tests that were impossible to pass and graded them harshly.

Who cares what the caption was under the photo on page 472? ...and who could possibly remember the exact words?

We were two grades in a room and in this room there was a row of 7th graders/row of 8th - then a space and the pattern repeated. (Yes, I'm that old!) The 7th graders looked up and found answers for the 8th grade and vice versa - just happening to have the notes or book on the desk so the other could see.

I LOVED learning; never had cheated before, but learned that year that the only way to 'pass' was to cheat and help others cheat. What a sad lesson.

As a teacher myself today, I work with students in a technology class. Yes, lucky me; students love to learn and use tech. They do have tests, but I make sure that they know what they are expected to learn, have plenty of opportunities to help each other learn it, and get to retake the test if they really had problems with something.

After all, it's about learning, NOT testing!

Donald Merrick (not verified)

Avoiding Cheating

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It is not as simple as one answer.

-You need to create a culture that will not tolerate cheating. A culture which shuns those who persist in cheating. A culture of respect and responsibility

-You also need to take steps to prevent cheating. Banning the use of cell phones and pagers, making multiple test forms (not hard with today's technology. Change it up so that anyone who tries to cheat does poorly academically. If the payoff is not there (the grade), they will not cheat. Many teachers just hand out 20 copies of the same test and then sit back. The cheaters love those classes.

-If necessary, there need to be disciplinary consequeces (not suspension) for cheating. The natural consequence is a failing grade. Add to this a parent conference or an immediate retake or simple low level detention and that will help.

There is no one answer but a series of steps that will discourage those who choose to cheat.

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